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Catabolism of pyrimidines in yeast: A tool to understand degradation of anticancer drugs

Andersen, Gorm LU ; Merico, A. ; Björnberg, Olof LU ; Andersen, Birgit LU ; Schnackerz, K. D. ; Dobritzsch, D. ; Piskur, Jure LU and Compagno, C. (2006) In Nucleosides, Nucleotides & Nucleic Acids 25(9-11). p.991-996
Abstract
The pyrimidine catabolic pathway is of crucial importance in cancer patients because it is involved in degradation of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as 5-fluorouracil; it also is important in plants, unicellular eukaryotes, and bacteria for the degradation of pyrimidine-based biocides/antibiotics. During the last decade we have developed a yeast species, Saccharomyces kluyveri, as a model and tool to study the genes and enzymes of the pyrimidine catabolic pathway. In this report, we studied degradation of uracil and its putative degradation products in 38 yeasts and showed that this pathway was present in the ancient yeasts but was lost approximately 100 million years ago in the S. cerevisiae lineage.
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author
; ; ; ; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
yeast, uracil degradation, pyrimidines, evolution, cancer
in
Nucleosides, Nucleotides & Nucleic Acids
volume
25
issue
9-11
pages
991 - 996
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000242019000005
  • scopus:33750457017
ISSN
1525-7770
DOI
10.1080/15257770600889386
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
75b89518-c953-4703-a336-126949ed46d3 (old id 376847)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:24:46
date last changed
2021-09-22 03:51:52
@article{75b89518-c953-4703-a336-126949ed46d3,
  abstract     = {The pyrimidine catabolic pathway is of crucial importance in cancer patients because it is involved in degradation of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as 5-fluorouracil; it also is important in plants, unicellular eukaryotes, and bacteria for the degradation of pyrimidine-based biocides/antibiotics. During the last decade we have developed a yeast species, Saccharomyces kluyveri, as a model and tool to study the genes and enzymes of the pyrimidine catabolic pathway. In this report, we studied degradation of uracil and its putative degradation products in 38 yeasts and showed that this pathway was present in the ancient yeasts but was lost approximately 100 million years ago in the S. cerevisiae lineage.},
  author       = {Andersen, Gorm and Merico, A. and Björnberg, Olof and Andersen, Birgit and Schnackerz, K. D. and Dobritzsch, D. and Piskur, Jure and Compagno, C.},
  issn         = {1525-7770},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9-11},
  pages        = {991--996},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Nucleosides, Nucleotides & Nucleic Acids},
  title        = {Catabolism of pyrimidines in yeast: A tool to understand degradation of anticancer drugs},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15257770600889386},
  doi          = {10.1080/15257770600889386},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2006},
}