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Thymidine kinases in archaea

Clausen, Anders Ranegaard LU ; Matakos, A ; Sandrini, Michael LU and Piskur, Jure LU (2006) In Nucleosides, Nucleotides & Nucleic Acids 25(9-11). p.1159-1163
Abstract
Twenty-six fully sequenced archaeal genomes were searched for genes coding for putative deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs). We identified only 5 human-like thymidine kinase 1 genes (TK1s) and none for non-TK1 kinases. Four TK1s were identified in the Euryarchaea and one was found in the Crenarchaea, while none was found in Nanoarchaeum. The identified TK1s have high identity to Gram-positive bacteria TK1s. The TK1s from archaea, Gram-positive bacteria and eukaryotes share the same common ancestor, while the TK1s from Gram-negative bacteria belong to a less-related subgroup. It seems that a functional deoxyribonucleoside salvage pathway is not crucial for the archaeal cell.
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author
; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
salvage pathway, thymidine kinase, deoxyribonucleosides kinase, evolution, archaea
in
Nucleosides, Nucleotides & Nucleic Acids
volume
25
issue
9-11
pages
1159 - 1163
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000242019000035
  • scopus:33750430871
ISSN
1525-7770
DOI
10.1080/15257770600894485
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0c4b4780-0f70-4e87-b082-18e76479ebef (old id 376869)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:46:02
date last changed
2021-06-23 05:19:32
@article{0c4b4780-0f70-4e87-b082-18e76479ebef,
  abstract     = {Twenty-six fully sequenced archaeal genomes were searched for genes coding for putative deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs). We identified only 5 human-like thymidine kinase 1 genes (TK1s) and none for non-TK1 kinases. Four TK1s were identified in the Euryarchaea and one was found in the Crenarchaea, while none was found in Nanoarchaeum. The identified TK1s have high identity to Gram-positive bacteria TK1s. The TK1s from archaea, Gram-positive bacteria and eukaryotes share the same common ancestor, while the TK1s from Gram-negative bacteria belong to a less-related subgroup. It seems that a functional deoxyribonucleoside salvage pathway is not crucial for the archaeal cell.},
  author       = {Clausen, Anders Ranegaard and Matakos, A and Sandrini, Michael and Piskur, Jure},
  issn         = {1525-7770},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9-11},
  pages        = {1159--1163},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Nucleosides, Nucleotides & Nucleic Acids},
  title        = {Thymidine kinases in archaea},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15257770600894485},
  doi          = {10.1080/15257770600894485},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2006},
}