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Hospitalization rate in offspring of cancer survivors : a national cohort study

Ji, Jianguang LU ; Huang, Wuqing LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2019) In Journal of Cancer Survivorship 13(2). p.187-196
Abstract

Purpose: The number of childbirths among cancer survivors continues to increase, but it is still largely unknown whether the children of cancer survivors might experience adverse health outcomes during the process of growing up. Methods: We identified all individuals diagnosed with cancer between 1958 and 2015 from the Swedish Cancer Registry and linked them to the Swedish Medical Birth Register to identify their offspring born between 1997 and 2015. Up to 10 children, whose parents did not have a diagnosis of cancer, were matched with the study population according to date of birth and gender. Results: By linking with the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register, we found that the hospitalization rate was 15% higher in offspring of female... (More)

Purpose: The number of childbirths among cancer survivors continues to increase, but it is still largely unknown whether the children of cancer survivors might experience adverse health outcomes during the process of growing up. Methods: We identified all individuals diagnosed with cancer between 1958 and 2015 from the Swedish Cancer Registry and linked them to the Swedish Medical Birth Register to identify their offspring born between 1997 and 2015. Up to 10 children, whose parents did not have a diagnosis of cancer, were matched with the study population according to date of birth and gender. Results: By linking with the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register, we found that the hospitalization rate was 15% higher in offspring of female cancer survivors, and 16% higher in offspring of male cancer survivors as compared to matched controls. Besides an increased risk of hospitalization due to malignant neoplasms (relative risk (RR) = 1.86, 99% CI 1.70–2.04) and benign neoplasms (RR = 1.48, 99% CI 1.18–1.86), a non-significant increased risk was found for hospitalization due to infectious and parasitic disease (RR = 1.09, 99% CI 0.98–1.21), diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanisms (RR = 1.33, 99% CI 0.98–1.80), and diseases of the circulatory system (RR = 1.05, 99% CI 0.98–1.12). Conclusion: Our study suggests that children of cancer survivors might experience a significantly increased rate of hospitalization, which calls for further studies. Implications for Cancer Survivors: Cancer survivors might be aware that the risk of hospitalization due to various diseases might be higher in their children as compared to the normal population.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cancer survivor, Cohort study, Epidemiology, Hospitalization rate
in
Journal of Cancer Survivorship
volume
13
issue
2
pages
187 - 196
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:30778817
  • scopus:85061753720
ISSN
1932-2259
DOI
10.1007/s11764-019-00741-5
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
380c5b88-18c4-47e0-a8f4-f6c4ad78d295
date added to LUP
2019-02-26 08:48:32
date last changed
2020-02-12 09:54:59
@article{380c5b88-18c4-47e0-a8f4-f6c4ad78d295,
  abstract     = {<p>Purpose: The number of childbirths among cancer survivors continues to increase, but it is still largely unknown whether the children of cancer survivors might experience adverse health outcomes during the process of growing up. Methods: We identified all individuals diagnosed with cancer between 1958 and 2015 from the Swedish Cancer Registry and linked them to the Swedish Medical Birth Register to identify their offspring born between 1997 and 2015. Up to 10 children, whose parents did not have a diagnosis of cancer, were matched with the study population according to date of birth and gender. Results: By linking with the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register, we found that the hospitalization rate was 15% higher in offspring of female cancer survivors, and 16% higher in offspring of male cancer survivors as compared to matched controls. Besides an increased risk of hospitalization due to malignant neoplasms (relative risk (RR) = 1.86, 99% CI 1.70–2.04) and benign neoplasms (RR = 1.48, 99% CI 1.18–1.86), a non-significant increased risk was found for hospitalization due to infectious and parasitic disease (RR = 1.09, 99% CI 0.98–1.21), diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanisms (RR = 1.33, 99% CI 0.98–1.80), and diseases of the circulatory system (RR = 1.05, 99% CI 0.98–1.12). Conclusion: Our study suggests that children of cancer survivors might experience a significantly increased rate of hospitalization, which calls for further studies. Implications for Cancer Survivors: Cancer survivors might be aware that the risk of hospitalization due to various diseases might be higher in their children as compared to the normal population.</p>},
  author       = {Ji, Jianguang and Huang, Wuqing and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1932-2259},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {187--196},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Journal of Cancer Survivorship},
  title        = {Hospitalization rate in offspring of cancer survivors : a national cohort study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11764-019-00741-5},
  doi          = {10.1007/s11764-019-00741-5},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2019},
}