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Upper secondary school students’ compliance with two Internet-based self-help programmes : a randomised controlled trial

Antonson, Carl LU ; Thorsén, Frida LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2017) In European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry p.1-10
Abstract

Psychiatric symptoms and stress are on the increase among Swedish adolescents. We aimed to study the potential effect and feasibility of two Internet-based self-help programmes, one mindfulness based (iMBI) and the other music based in a randomised controlled trial that targeted adolescents. A total of 283 upper secondary school students in two Swedish schools were randomised to either a waiting list or one of the two programmes, on their own incentive, on schooltime. General psychiatric health (Symptoms Checklist 90), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale) were assessed before and after the interventions. In total, 202 participants answered the questionnaires. Less than 20 logged... (More)

Psychiatric symptoms and stress are on the increase among Swedish adolescents. We aimed to study the potential effect and feasibility of two Internet-based self-help programmes, one mindfulness based (iMBI) and the other music based in a randomised controlled trial that targeted adolescents. A total of 283 upper secondary school students in two Swedish schools were randomised to either a waiting list or one of the two programmes, on their own incentive, on schooltime. General psychiatric health (Symptoms Checklist 90), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale) were assessed before and after the interventions. In total, 202 participants answered the questionnaires. Less than 20 logged into each intervention and only 1 performed a full intervention (iMBI). No significant differences in any of the scales were found between those who logged in and those who did not. The potential effect of Internet-based self-help programmes was not possible to examine due to low compliance rates. Adolescents seem to have a very low compliance with Internet-based self-help programmes if left to their own incentive. There were no associations between the psychiatric and stress-related symptoms at baseline and compliance in any of the intervention groups, and no evidence for differences in compliance in relation to the type of programme. Additional studies are needed to examine how compliance rates can be increased in Internet-based self-help mindfulness programmes in adolescents, as the potentially positive effects of mindfulness are partly related to compliance rates.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adolescence, Compliance, Internet, Mindfulness, Psychiatric symptoms, Psychological stress
in
European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
pages
10 pages
publisher
Springer Medizin
external identifiers
  • scopus:85026819081
ISSN
1018-8827
DOI
10.1007/s00787-017-1035-6
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
384097f1-d59c-4318-9cbb-90c7de301c68
date added to LUP
2017-08-22 16:53:00
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:15:47
@article{384097f1-d59c-4318-9cbb-90c7de301c68,
  abstract     = {<p>Psychiatric symptoms and stress are on the increase among Swedish adolescents. We aimed to study the potential effect and feasibility of two Internet-based self-help programmes, one mindfulness based (iMBI) and the other music based in a randomised controlled trial that targeted adolescents. A total of 283 upper secondary school students in two Swedish schools were randomised to either a waiting list or one of the two programmes, on their own incentive, on schooltime. General psychiatric health (Symptoms Checklist 90), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale) were assessed before and after the interventions. In total, 202 participants answered the questionnaires. Less than 20 logged into each intervention and only 1 performed a full intervention (iMBI). No significant differences in any of the scales were found between those who logged in and those who did not. The potential effect of Internet-based self-help programmes was not possible to examine due to low compliance rates. Adolescents seem to have a very low compliance with Internet-based self-help programmes if left to their own incentive. There were no associations between the psychiatric and stress-related symptoms at baseline and compliance in any of the intervention groups, and no evidence for differences in compliance in relation to the type of programme. Additional studies are needed to examine how compliance rates can be increased in Internet-based self-help mindfulness programmes in adolescents, as the potentially positive effects of mindfulness are partly related to compliance rates.</p>},
  author       = {Antonson, Carl and Thorsén, Frida and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1018-8827},
  keyword      = {Adolescence,Compliance,Internet,Mindfulness,Psychiatric symptoms,Psychological stress},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  pages        = {1--10},
  publisher    = {Springer Medizin},
  series       = {European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry},
  title        = {Upper secondary school students’ compliance with two Internet-based self-help programmes : a randomised controlled trial},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-017-1035-6},
  year         = {2017},
}