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Calvarial bone healing under spring distension at continuous forces

Pignatti, Marco ; Hansson, Hans-Arne and Gewalli, Fredrik LU (2006) In Annals of Plastic Surgery 57(5). p.561-568
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate in young animals the dynamics of calvarial bone healing when exposing a bone defect to continuous forces for up to 13 weeks. Six-week-old rabbits after a sagittal suture strip craniectomy were randomized for either of the following protocols: (1) no spring was applied (n = 7); (2) a titanium-molybdenum alloy (TMA) lower-force spring was inserted across the craniectomy gap (n = 9); (3) a stainless steel (SS) higher-force spring was applied (n = 8), or (4) sham operation (n = 8). Results showed that the surgically created calvarial bone gap was after 3 weeks kept widened both when a spring of lower force (TMA) and when a spring exerting a higher force (SS) was applied. At 6 weeks, none of the... (More)
The aim of the present study was to evaluate in young animals the dynamics of calvarial bone healing when exposing a bone defect to continuous forces for up to 13 weeks. Six-week-old rabbits after a sagittal suture strip craniectomy were randomized for either of the following protocols: (1) no spring was applied (n = 7); (2) a titanium-molybdenum alloy (TMA) lower-force spring was inserted across the craniectomy gap (n = 9); (3) a stainless steel (SS) higher-force spring was applied (n = 8), or (4) sham operation (n = 8). Results showed that the surgically created calvarial bone gap was after 3 weeks kept widened both when a spring of lower force (TMA) and when a spring exerting a higher force (SS) was applied. At 6 weeks, none of the rabbits of the spring-exposed (2 and 3) groups had any bone bridging the gap, while bone bridging was visible in animals of the 2 groups (I and 4) lacking springs. Strikingly enough, in both spring-treated groups, the surgically created defect was still after 13 weeks incompletely bridged by bone, interposed by connective tissue, most evidently in those exposed to higher forces (SS). In contrast, a normal sagittal suture enclosed by lamellar bone was seen in both the sham and the strip groups. We conclude that exposing a surgically created calvarial bone defect to continuous mechanical forces delayed the bridging of the bone defect by at least 13 weeks, even if the force exerted by either spring was very low. In any case, when a higher force (SS group) was applied, the bone reunion was efficiently prevented. No side effects were recognized. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
sagittal suture, calvaria, springs, expansion, bone healing, distraction
in
Annals of Plastic Surgery
volume
57
issue
5
pages
561 - 568
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000241533300015
  • scopus:33750333227
ISSN
1536-3708
DOI
10.1097/01.sap.0000229019.29857.14
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d487ff02-01bd-4e20-93fd-32e3a169314c (old id 384240)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:02:49
date last changed
2021-02-17 02:40:25
@article{d487ff02-01bd-4e20-93fd-32e3a169314c,
  abstract     = {The aim of the present study was to evaluate in young animals the dynamics of calvarial bone healing when exposing a bone defect to continuous forces for up to 13 weeks. Six-week-old rabbits after a sagittal suture strip craniectomy were randomized for either of the following protocols: (1) no spring was applied (n = 7); (2) a titanium-molybdenum alloy (TMA) lower-force spring was inserted across the craniectomy gap (n = 9); (3) a stainless steel (SS) higher-force spring was applied (n = 8), or (4) sham operation (n = 8). Results showed that the surgically created calvarial bone gap was after 3 weeks kept widened both when a spring of lower force (TMA) and when a spring exerting a higher force (SS) was applied. At 6 weeks, none of the rabbits of the spring-exposed (2 and 3) groups had any bone bridging the gap, while bone bridging was visible in animals of the 2 groups (I and 4) lacking springs. Strikingly enough, in both spring-treated groups, the surgically created defect was still after 13 weeks incompletely bridged by bone, interposed by connective tissue, most evidently in those exposed to higher forces (SS). In contrast, a normal sagittal suture enclosed by lamellar bone was seen in both the sham and the strip groups. We conclude that exposing a surgically created calvarial bone defect to continuous mechanical forces delayed the bridging of the bone defect by at least 13 weeks, even if the force exerted by either spring was very low. In any case, when a higher force (SS group) was applied, the bone reunion was efficiently prevented. No side effects were recognized.},
  author       = {Pignatti, Marco and Hansson, Hans-Arne and Gewalli, Fredrik},
  issn         = {1536-3708},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {561--568},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Annals of Plastic Surgery},
  title        = {Calvarial bone healing under spring distension at continuous forces},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.sap.0000229019.29857.14},
  doi          = {10.1097/01.sap.0000229019.29857.14},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2006},
}