Skip to main content

Lund University Publications

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Copper reduced mating behaviour in male shore crabs (Carcinus maenas (L.))

Krang, Anna-Sara and Ekerholm, Mattias LU (2006) In Aquatic Toxicology 80(1). p.60-69
Abstract
Many crustaceans use pheromones to find mates and induce mating behaviours. If pollutants impair the ability to detect chemosensory cues and respond to pheromone signals, they could profoundly affect mating. In a series of laboratory experiments, the effect of copper (0, 0.1 or 0.5 mg Cu(II) per litre for 5 days) on specific components of the mating behaviour of male shore crab Carcinus maenas was investigated, as well as differences in sensitivity between red and green colour morphs. The results show that copper exposure clearly altered the response of C. maenas males to a pheromone stimulus (pre-moult female urine) presented alone, together with a dummy female (a sponge injected with pre-moult female urine) or with a real female. Crabs... (More)
Many crustaceans use pheromones to find mates and induce mating behaviours. If pollutants impair the ability to detect chemosensory cues and respond to pheromone signals, they could profoundly affect mating. In a series of laboratory experiments, the effect of copper (0, 0.1 or 0.5 mg Cu(II) per litre for 5 days) on specific components of the mating behaviour of male shore crab Carcinus maenas was investigated, as well as differences in sensitivity between red and green colour morphs. The results show that copper exposure clearly altered the response of C. maenas males to a pheromone stimulus (pre-moult female urine) presented alone, together with a dummy female (a sponge injected with pre-moult female urine) or with a real female. Crabs exposed to the highest copper treatment took more than twice as long to initiate search activity after pheromone introduction and their search behaviour was less directed. When offered a dummy female, male crabs showed decreased pheromone discrimination in both copper treatments. Stroking was the only mating behaviour significantly affected, with a 90% reduction in red crabs in the highest copper treatment. Additionally, crabs of the highest copper treatment more often pinched the dummy female (non-mating behaviour). Finally, male crabs exposed to copper more often pinched pre-moult females and it took about three times longer to establish cradle-carrying. Thus, copper affects the ability of males to detect female pheromones, perform specific mating behaviours and to form pairs. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
behavioural alteration, chemosensory, pheromone, mating, copper, shore crab, Carcinus maenas
in
Aquatic Toxicology
volume
80
issue
1
pages
60 - 69
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000241313000006
  • scopus:33748760884
ISSN
1879-1514
DOI
10.1016/j.aquatox.2006.07.014
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Zoology (Closed 2011) (011012000)
id
99ebe81e-56bf-495e-8d6f-8d80c9d63d0e (old id 388236)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:49:11
date last changed
2021-08-04 03:04:33
@article{99ebe81e-56bf-495e-8d6f-8d80c9d63d0e,
  abstract     = {Many crustaceans use pheromones to find mates and induce mating behaviours. If pollutants impair the ability to detect chemosensory cues and respond to pheromone signals, they could profoundly affect mating. In a series of laboratory experiments, the effect of copper (0, 0.1 or 0.5 mg Cu(II) per litre for 5 days) on specific components of the mating behaviour of male shore crab Carcinus maenas was investigated, as well as differences in sensitivity between red and green colour morphs. The results show that copper exposure clearly altered the response of C. maenas males to a pheromone stimulus (pre-moult female urine) presented alone, together with a dummy female (a sponge injected with pre-moult female urine) or with a real female. Crabs exposed to the highest copper treatment took more than twice as long to initiate search activity after pheromone introduction and their search behaviour was less directed. When offered a dummy female, male crabs showed decreased pheromone discrimination in both copper treatments. Stroking was the only mating behaviour significantly affected, with a 90% reduction in red crabs in the highest copper treatment. Additionally, crabs of the highest copper treatment more often pinched the dummy female (non-mating behaviour). Finally, male crabs exposed to copper more often pinched pre-moult females and it took about three times longer to establish cradle-carrying. Thus, copper affects the ability of males to detect female pheromones, perform specific mating behaviours and to form pairs. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Krang, Anna-Sara and Ekerholm, Mattias},
  issn         = {1879-1514},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {60--69},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Aquatic Toxicology},
  title        = {Copper reduced mating behaviour in male shore crabs (Carcinus maenas (L.))},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquatox.2006.07.014},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.aquatox.2006.07.014},
  volume       = {80},
  year         = {2006},
}