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Separation of lactic acid-producing bacteria from fermentation broth using a ceramic microfiltration membrane with constant permeate flow

Persson, A; Jönsson, Ann-Sofi LU and Zacchi, Guido LU (2001) In Biotechnology and Bioengineering 72(3). p.269-277
Abstract
The influence of several operating parameters on the critical flux in the separation of lactic acid-producing bacteria from fermentation broth was studied using a ceramic microfiltration membrane equipped with a permeate pump. The operating parameters studied were crossflow velocity over the membrane, bacterial cell concentration, protein concentration, and pH. The influence of the isoelectric point (IEP) of the membrane was also investigated. In the interval studied (5.3-10.8 m/s), the crossflow velocity had a marked effect on the critical flux. When the crossflow velocity was increased the critical flux also increased. The bacterial cells were retained by the membrane and the concentration of bacterial cells did not affect the critical... (More)
The influence of several operating parameters on the critical flux in the separation of lactic acid-producing bacteria from fermentation broth was studied using a ceramic microfiltration membrane equipped with a permeate pump. The operating parameters studied were crossflow velocity over the membrane, bacterial cell concentration, protein concentration, and pH. The influence of the isoelectric point (IEP) of the membrane was also investigated. In the interval studied (5.3-10.8 m/s), the crossflow velocity had a marked effect on the critical flux. When the crossflow velocity was increased the critical flux also increased. The bacterial cells were retained by the membrane and the concentration of bacterial cells did not affect the critical flux in the interval studied (1.1-3.1 g/L). The critical flux decreased when the protein concentration was increased. It was found that the protein was adsorbed on the membrane surface and protein retention occurred even though the conditions were such that no filter cake was present on the membrane surface. When the pH of the medium was lowered from 6 to 5 land then further to 4) the critical flux decreased from 76 L/m(2)h to zero at both pH 5 and pH 4. This was found to be due to the fact that the lowering in pH had affected the physiology of the bacterial cells so that the bacteria tended to adhere to the membrane and to each other. The critical flux, for wheat flour hydrolysate without particles, was much lower (28 L/m(2)/h) when using a membrane with an IEP of 5.5 than the critical flux of a membrane with an IEP at pH 7 (96 L/m(2)h). This was found to be due to an increased affinity of the bacteria for the membrane with the lower IEP. (C) 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
lactic acid, critical flux, microfiltration, ceramic membrane
in
Biotechnology and Bioengineering
volume
72
issue
3
pages
269 - 277
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000166456100003
  • scopus:0035809064
ISSN
1097-0290
DOI
10.1002/1097-0290(20010205)72:3<269::AID-BIT3>3.0.CO;2-H
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
76093cb1-cbd6-4eea-a167-68d4a5d9bee8 (old id 3911311)
date added to LUP
2013-07-01 08:22:16
date last changed
2018-01-07 06:19:15
@article{76093cb1-cbd6-4eea-a167-68d4a5d9bee8,
  abstract     = {The influence of several operating parameters on the critical flux in the separation of lactic acid-producing bacteria from fermentation broth was studied using a ceramic microfiltration membrane equipped with a permeate pump. The operating parameters studied were crossflow velocity over the membrane, bacterial cell concentration, protein concentration, and pH. The influence of the isoelectric point (IEP) of the membrane was also investigated. In the interval studied (5.3-10.8 m/s), the crossflow velocity had a marked effect on the critical flux. When the crossflow velocity was increased the critical flux also increased. The bacterial cells were retained by the membrane and the concentration of bacterial cells did not affect the critical flux in the interval studied (1.1-3.1 g/L). The critical flux decreased when the protein concentration was increased. It was found that the protein was adsorbed on the membrane surface and protein retention occurred even though the conditions were such that no filter cake was present on the membrane surface. When the pH of the medium was lowered from 6 to 5 land then further to 4) the critical flux decreased from 76 L/m(2)h to zero at both pH 5 and pH 4. This was found to be due to the fact that the lowering in pH had affected the physiology of the bacterial cells so that the bacteria tended to adhere to the membrane and to each other. The critical flux, for wheat flour hydrolysate without particles, was much lower (28 L/m(2)/h) when using a membrane with an IEP of 5.5 than the critical flux of a membrane with an IEP at pH 7 (96 L/m(2)h). This was found to be due to an increased affinity of the bacteria for the membrane with the lower IEP. (C) 2001 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Inc.},
  author       = {Persson, A and Jönsson, Ann-Sofi and Zacchi, Guido},
  issn         = {1097-0290},
  keyword      = {lactic acid,critical flux,microfiltration,ceramic membrane},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {269--277},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Biotechnology and Bioengineering},
  title        = {Separation of lactic acid-producing bacteria from fermentation broth using a ceramic microfiltration membrane with constant permeate flow},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/1097-0290(20010205)72:3<269::AID-BIT3>3.0.CO;2-H},
  volume       = {72},
  year         = {2001},
}