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Effect of substrate and cellulase concentration on simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of steam-pretreated softwood for ethanol production

Stenberg, K; Bollok, M; Reczey, K; Galbe, Mats LU and Zacchi, Guido LU (2000) In Biotechnology and Bioengineering 68(2). p.204-210
Abstract
Economic optimization of the production of ethanol by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) requires knowledge about the influence of substrate and enzyme concentration on yield and productivity. Although SSF has been investigated extensively, the optimal conditions for SSF of softwoods have yet not been determined. In this study, SO2-impregnated and steam-pretreated spruce was used as substrate for the production of ethanol by SSF. Commercial enzymes were used in combination with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The effects of the concentration of substrate (2% to 10% w/w) and of cellulases (5 to 32 FPU/g cellulose) were investigated. SSF was found to be sensitive to contamination because lactic acid was produced. The... (More)
Economic optimization of the production of ethanol by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) requires knowledge about the influence of substrate and enzyme concentration on yield and productivity. Although SSF has been investigated extensively, the optimal conditions for SSF of softwoods have yet not been determined. In this study, SO2-impregnated and steam-pretreated spruce was used as substrate for the production of ethanol by SSF. Commercial enzymes were used in combination with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The effects of the concentration of substrate (2% to 10% w/w) and of cellulases (5 to 32 FPU/g cellulose) were investigated. SSF was found to be sensitive to contamination because lactic acid was produced. The ethanol yield increased with increasing cellulase loading. The highest ethanol yield, 68% of the theoretical based on the glucose and mannose present in the original wood, was obtained at 5% substrate concentration. This yield corresponds to 82% of the theoretical based on the cellulose and soluble glucose and mannose present at the start of SSF. A higher substrate concentration caused inefficient fermentation, whereas a lower substrate concentration, 2%, resulted in increased formation of lactic acid, which lowered the yield. Compared with separate hydrolysis and fermentation, SSF gave a higher yield and doubled the productivity. (C) 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
simultaneous saccharification and fermentation, (SSF), softwood, ethanol, fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inhibition
in
Biotechnology and Bioengineering
volume
68
issue
2
pages
204 - 210
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000086230900009
  • scopus:0034690215
ISSN
1097-0290
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1097-0290(20000420)68:2<204::AID-BIT9>3.0.CO;2-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a30e18ec-100e-4c04-a623-4b73cefb4937 (old id 3911353)
date added to LUP
2013-06-28 14:42:36
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:55:18
@article{a30e18ec-100e-4c04-a623-4b73cefb4937,
  abstract     = {Economic optimization of the production of ethanol by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) requires knowledge about the influence of substrate and enzyme concentration on yield and productivity. Although SSF has been investigated extensively, the optimal conditions for SSF of softwoods have yet not been determined. In this study, SO2-impregnated and steam-pretreated spruce was used as substrate for the production of ethanol by SSF. Commercial enzymes were used in combination with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The effects of the concentration of substrate (2% to 10% w/w) and of cellulases (5 to 32 FPU/g cellulose) were investigated. SSF was found to be sensitive to contamination because lactic acid was produced. The ethanol yield increased with increasing cellulase loading. The highest ethanol yield, 68% of the theoretical based on the glucose and mannose present in the original wood, was obtained at 5% substrate concentration. This yield corresponds to 82% of the theoretical based on the cellulose and soluble glucose and mannose present at the start of SSF. A higher substrate concentration caused inefficient fermentation, whereas a lower substrate concentration, 2%, resulted in increased formation of lactic acid, which lowered the yield. Compared with separate hydrolysis and fermentation, SSF gave a higher yield and doubled the productivity. (C) 2000 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Inc.},
  author       = {Stenberg, K and Bollok, M and Reczey, K and Galbe, Mats and Zacchi, Guido},
  issn         = {1097-0290},
  keyword      = {simultaneous saccharification and fermentation,(SSF),softwood,ethanol,fermentation,Saccharomyces cerevisiae,inhibition},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {204--210},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Biotechnology and Bioengineering},
  title        = {Effect of substrate and cellulase concentration on simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of steam-pretreated softwood for ethanol production},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1097-0290(20000420)68:2<204::AID-BIT9>3.0.CO;2-4},
  volume       = {68},
  year         = {2000},
}