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Design and operation of a bench-scale process development unit for the production of ethanol from lignocellulosics

Palmqvist, E; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel LU ; Galbe, Mats LU ; Larsson, M; Stenberg, K; Szengyel, Z; Tengborg, C and Zacchi, Guido LU (1996) In Bioresource Technology 58(2). p.171-179
Abstract
A bench-scale unit for the development of an enzymatic process for the bioconversion of lignocellulosics to ethanol has been used to study the recycling of waste-water streams to minimize fresh-water requirements and reduce effluent streams. Willow, after impregnation with sulphur dioxide, was steam-pretreated, enzymatically hydrolysed, and the sugars produced were fermented using S. cerevisiae. The fermentation broth was distilled and the stillage was fractionated by evaporation into six separate condensate fractions and a residue. The overall yield of ethanol from willow was 65% of the theoretical yield based on total fermentable sugars. The inhibitory effect of the evaporation condensates was assessed by fermentation using S.... (More)
A bench-scale unit for the development of an enzymatic process for the bioconversion of lignocellulosics to ethanol has been used to study the recycling of waste-water streams to minimize fresh-water requirements and reduce effluent streams. Willow, after impregnation with sulphur dioxide, was steam-pretreated, enzymatically hydrolysed, and the sugars produced were fermented using S. cerevisiae. The fermentation broth was distilled and the stillage was fractionated by evaporation into six separate condensate fractions and a residue. The overall yield of ethanol from willow was 65% of the theoretical yield based on total fermentable sugars. The inhibitory effect of the evaporation condensates was assessed by fermentation using S. cerevisiae. The non-volatile residue of the stillage was found to be inhibitory to fermentation. The ethanol yield decreased from 0.37 g/g in a pure sugar reference to 0.31 g/g in the residue and the average ethanol fermentation rate decreased fi om 6.3 g/(l h) to 2.7 g/(l h), respectively. The evaporation condensates, containing the volatile components, showed no negative effects on fermentation. The intermediate evaporation condensate fractions, fractions 4 and 5, had the lowest chemical oxygen demand (GOD), 1560 and 1120 mg/l, compared with 33 300 mg/l for the stillage. Therefore, these fractions can be released directly into the effluent without further treatment. Copyright (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
ethanol production, enzymatic process, lignocellulosics, willow, steam, treatment, inhibitors, waste-water recycling
in
Bioresource Technology
volume
58
issue
2
pages
171 - 179
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:A1996WG39800009
  • scopus:0030295096
ISSN
1873-2976
DOI
10.1016/S0960-8524(96)00096-X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d2c81a58-a61d-42c1-ad93-72ba7895eb31 (old id 3911499)
date added to LUP
2013-06-28 13:19:56
date last changed
2017-07-23 04:30:38
@article{d2c81a58-a61d-42c1-ad93-72ba7895eb31,
  abstract     = {A bench-scale unit for the development of an enzymatic process for the bioconversion of lignocellulosics to ethanol has been used to study the recycling of waste-water streams to minimize fresh-water requirements and reduce effluent streams. Willow, after impregnation with sulphur dioxide, was steam-pretreated, enzymatically hydrolysed, and the sugars produced were fermented using S. cerevisiae. The fermentation broth was distilled and the stillage was fractionated by evaporation into six separate condensate fractions and a residue. The overall yield of ethanol from willow was 65% of the theoretical yield based on total fermentable sugars. The inhibitory effect of the evaporation condensates was assessed by fermentation using S. cerevisiae. The non-volatile residue of the stillage was found to be inhibitory to fermentation. The ethanol yield decreased from 0.37 g/g in a pure sugar reference to 0.31 g/g in the residue and the average ethanol fermentation rate decreased fi om 6.3 g/(l h) to 2.7 g/(l h), respectively. The evaporation condensates, containing the volatile components, showed no negative effects on fermentation. The intermediate evaporation condensate fractions, fractions 4 and 5, had the lowest chemical oxygen demand (GOD), 1560 and 1120 mg/l, compared with 33 300 mg/l for the stillage. Therefore, these fractions can be released directly into the effluent without further treatment. Copyright (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.},
  author       = {Palmqvist, E and Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel and Galbe, Mats and Larsson, M and Stenberg, K and Szengyel, Z and Tengborg, C and Zacchi, Guido},
  issn         = {1873-2976},
  keyword      = {ethanol production,enzymatic process,lignocellulosics,willow,steam,treatment,inhibitors,waste-water recycling},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {171--179},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Bioresource Technology},
  title        = {Design and operation of a bench-scale process development unit for the production of ethanol from lignocellulosics},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0960-8524(96)00096-X},
  volume       = {58},
  year         = {1996},
}