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Psychosocial consequences in men taking part in a national screening program for abdominal aortic aneurysm

Ericsson, Anna; Holst, Jan LU ; Gottsäter, Anders LU ; Zarrouk, Moncef LU and Kumlien, Christine (2017) In Journal of Vascular Nursing 35(4). p.211-220
Abstract

Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has proven to reduce AAA-related mortality, but how the knowledge of having an untreated AAA affects health and daily life requires further clarification. The aim was to investigate the psychosocial consequences and sense of coherence (SOC) in 65-year-old men diagnosed with AAA and participating in a national screening program during a 6-month follow-up compared with men with no AAA. The single-center cohort study included 52 men with AAA and 118 men without AAA. A questionnaire including the Short Form 36 Health Survey, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, SOC, questions concerning stress, and questions related to AAA were answered at baseline and after 6 months. Men with AAA reported... (More)

Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has proven to reduce AAA-related mortality, but how the knowledge of having an untreated AAA affects health and daily life requires further clarification. The aim was to investigate the psychosocial consequences and sense of coherence (SOC) in 65-year-old men diagnosed with AAA and participating in a national screening program during a 6-month follow-up compared with men with no AAA. The single-center cohort study included 52 men with AAA and 118 men without AAA. A questionnaire including the Short Form 36 Health Survey, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, SOC, questions concerning stress, and questions related to AAA were answered at baseline and after 6 months. Men with AAA reported more problems with physical functioning, pain, and general health than men with a normal aorta at baseline. After 6 months, men with AAA still reported more problems with physical functioning and stress in relation to disease than men with normal aortic diameter. No differences were observed between groups in SOC, anxiety, and depression. A significantly higher satisfaction with information from the physician and desire to learn about the AAA diagnosis was reported at baseline compared with that at follow-up. Having knowledge about the AAA diagnosis may moderately impact physical health and perceived stress, and in combination with the increased prevalence of other cardiovascular diseases, may lead to impaired perceived health for men diagnosed with AAA.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Vascular Nursing
volume
35
issue
4
pages
211 - 220
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85028332504
ISSN
1062-0303
DOI
10.1016/j.jvn.2017.06.001
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
3933d8bf-2873-4947-82c2-82235c2f0cfb
date added to LUP
2017-09-05 07:48:06
date last changed
2018-01-17 14:16:30
@article{3933d8bf-2873-4947-82c2-82235c2f0cfb,
  abstract     = {<p>Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has proven to reduce AAA-related mortality, but how the knowledge of having an untreated AAA affects health and daily life requires further clarification. The aim was to investigate the psychosocial consequences and sense of coherence (SOC) in 65-year-old men diagnosed with AAA and participating in a national screening program during a 6-month follow-up compared with men with no AAA. The single-center cohort study included 52 men with AAA and 118 men without AAA. A questionnaire including the Short Form 36 Health Survey, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, SOC, questions concerning stress, and questions related to AAA were answered at baseline and after 6 months. Men with AAA reported more problems with physical functioning, pain, and general health than men with a normal aorta at baseline. After 6 months, men with AAA still reported more problems with physical functioning and stress in relation to disease than men with normal aortic diameter. No differences were observed between groups in SOC, anxiety, and depression. A significantly higher satisfaction with information from the physician and desire to learn about the AAA diagnosis was reported at baseline compared with that at follow-up. Having knowledge about the AAA diagnosis may moderately impact physical health and perceived stress, and in combination with the increased prevalence of other cardiovascular diseases, may lead to impaired perceived health for men diagnosed with AAA.</p>},
  author       = {Ericsson, Anna and Holst, Jan and Gottsäter, Anders and Zarrouk, Moncef and Kumlien, Christine },
  issn         = {1062-0303},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {211--220},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Vascular Nursing},
  title        = {Psychosocial consequences in men taking part in a national screening program for abdominal aortic aneurysm},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvn.2017.06.001},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2017},
}