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Design issues and priorities in team and nonpharmacological arthritis care research

Iversen, Maura Daly and Petersson, Ingemar LU (2006) In Journal of Rheumatology 33(9). p.1904-1907
Abstract
Nonpharmacologic and team care research present unique design challenges. Nonpharmacologic care by nature is multifaceted and complex. Rarely do patients receive an intervention in isolation. The delivery of a single or group of interventions can be provided by one provider but is frequently provided by teams. Therefore, it is imperative that clinical researchers design studies that evaluate single and multimodal interventions as well as studies that best reproduce the team model of service delivery to accurately examine interventions. While it is well accepted that the research question drives the design, it is imperative to recognize that certain aspects of nonpharmacologic and team care restrict the implementation or effectiveness of... (More)
Nonpharmacologic and team care research present unique design challenges. Nonpharmacologic care by nature is multifaceted and complex. Rarely do patients receive an intervention in isolation. The delivery of a single or group of interventions can be provided by one provider but is frequently provided by teams. Therefore, it is imperative that clinical researchers design studies that evaluate single and multimodal interventions as well as studies that best reproduce the team model of service delivery to accurately examine interventions. While it is well accepted that the research question drives the design, it is imperative to recognize that certain aspects of nonpharmacologic and team care restrict the implementation or effectiveness of specific design components. For example, as patients are required to actively engage in lifestyle changes, double-blinding cannot be employed. In addition, there is no accepted operational definition of team care in arthritis. It is important to keep in mind the characteristics of these interventions in the selection of a research design and develop strategies to best examine these interventions. Combining aspects of randomized controlled trials with qualitative methods is one technique to enrich data collected on these interventions. Certain features of pharmacovigilance studies may also serve as an alternative model. The use of national or regional registries for longterm clinical followup as seen in orthopedic surgery may prove to be applicable in the design of studies for evaluation of team care. Our article will discuss issues related to the design and synthesis of arthritis care research, and the role of patients in the design of clinical trials; describe collaborative international activities furthering team and nonpharmacological arthritis care research; and identify research activities that may influence future practice and the health of people with arthritis. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
team, study design, arthritis, nonpharmacologic care
in
Journal of Rheumatology
volume
33
issue
9
pages
1904 - 1907
publisher
J Rheumatol Publ Co
external identifiers
  • wos:000240377400040
  • scopus:33748567806
ISSN
0315-162X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
230ec2b5-1dcc-4108-9dc3-513ca3fdf190 (old id 394054)
alternative location
http://www.jrheum.com/abstracts/abstracts06/1904.html
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:34:11
date last changed
2020-03-11 03:01:21
@article{230ec2b5-1dcc-4108-9dc3-513ca3fdf190,
  abstract     = {Nonpharmacologic and team care research present unique design challenges. Nonpharmacologic care by nature is multifaceted and complex. Rarely do patients receive an intervention in isolation. The delivery of a single or group of interventions can be provided by one provider but is frequently provided by teams. Therefore, it is imperative that clinical researchers design studies that evaluate single and multimodal interventions as well as studies that best reproduce the team model of service delivery to accurately examine interventions. While it is well accepted that the research question drives the design, it is imperative to recognize that certain aspects of nonpharmacologic and team care restrict the implementation or effectiveness of specific design components. For example, as patients are required to actively engage in lifestyle changes, double-blinding cannot be employed. In addition, there is no accepted operational definition of team care in arthritis. It is important to keep in mind the characteristics of these interventions in the selection of a research design and develop strategies to best examine these interventions. Combining aspects of randomized controlled trials with qualitative methods is one technique to enrich data collected on these interventions. Certain features of pharmacovigilance studies may also serve as an alternative model. The use of national or regional registries for longterm clinical followup as seen in orthopedic surgery may prove to be applicable in the design of studies for evaluation of team care. Our article will discuss issues related to the design and synthesis of arthritis care research, and the role of patients in the design of clinical trials; describe collaborative international activities furthering team and nonpharmacological arthritis care research; and identify research activities that may influence future practice and the health of people with arthritis.},
  author       = {Iversen, Maura Daly and Petersson, Ingemar},
  issn         = {0315-162X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1904--1907},
  publisher    = {J Rheumatol Publ Co},
  series       = {Journal of Rheumatology},
  title        = {Design issues and priorities in team and nonpharmacological arthritis care research},
  url          = {http://www.jrheum.com/abstracts/abstracts06/1904.html},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2006},
}