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Spatial variability of soil fungal and bacterial abundance: Consequences for carbon turnover along a transition from a forested to clear-cut site

Churchland, Carolyn ; Grayston, Sue J. and Bengtson, Per LU (2013) In Soil Biology & Biochemistry 63. p.5-13
Abstract
Predicted alterations in belowground plant-allocated C as a result of environmental change may cause compositional shifts in soil microbial communities, and it has been hypothesized that such alterations will influence C mitigation in forest ecosystems. In order to investigate to what degree living trees influence the abundance and activity of mycorrhizal fungi, saprotrophic fungi, and bacteria we used a geostatistical approach to examine natural abundance stable-isotope-ratios of soil microbial PLFAs, respired CO2, and different soil organic C pools in a 100 point grid extending from an area of retention trees into a clear-cut area. Labile C from trees was the major source of C for the fungal communities and influenced the composition of... (More)
Predicted alterations in belowground plant-allocated C as a result of environmental change may cause compositional shifts in soil microbial communities, and it has been hypothesized that such alterations will influence C mitigation in forest ecosystems. In order to investigate to what degree living trees influence the abundance and activity of mycorrhizal fungi, saprotrophic fungi, and bacteria we used a geostatistical approach to examine natural abundance stable-isotope-ratios of soil microbial PLFAs, respired CO2, and different soil organic C pools in a 100 point grid extending from an area of retention trees into a clear-cut area. Labile C from trees was the major source of C for the fungal communities and influenced the composition of the microbial community and soil respiration rates up to ten meters into the clear-cut. When the input of labile plant C decreased, it appeared that microorganisms became increasingly dependent on recycled C released during microbial turnover, resulting in a decrease in soil respiration. Our findings demonstrate that plants not only influence the structure and function of soil microbial communities but also act as important regulators of belowground C flux, soil C sequestration and, ultimately, soil C stocks. (c) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Carbon cycling, Soil microorganisms, Forests, Spatial variation, C-13, natural abundance, CO2, Clear-cut
in
Soil Biology & Biochemistry
volume
63
pages
5 - 13
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000320639300002
  • scopus:84876485248
ISSN
0038-0717
DOI
10.1016/j.soilbio.2013.03.015
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3945a360-1fc9-469c-9e1b-25ac456a11b9 (old id 3980028)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 14:26:10
date last changed
2020-01-12 16:01:53
@article{3945a360-1fc9-469c-9e1b-25ac456a11b9,
  abstract     = {Predicted alterations in belowground plant-allocated C as a result of environmental change may cause compositional shifts in soil microbial communities, and it has been hypothesized that such alterations will influence C mitigation in forest ecosystems. In order to investigate to what degree living trees influence the abundance and activity of mycorrhizal fungi, saprotrophic fungi, and bacteria we used a geostatistical approach to examine natural abundance stable-isotope-ratios of soil microbial PLFAs, respired CO2, and different soil organic C pools in a 100 point grid extending from an area of retention trees into a clear-cut area. Labile C from trees was the major source of C for the fungal communities and influenced the composition of the microbial community and soil respiration rates up to ten meters into the clear-cut. When the input of labile plant C decreased, it appeared that microorganisms became increasingly dependent on recycled C released during microbial turnover, resulting in a decrease in soil respiration. Our findings demonstrate that plants not only influence the structure and function of soil microbial communities but also act as important regulators of belowground C flux, soil C sequestration and, ultimately, soil C stocks. (c) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Churchland, Carolyn and Grayston, Sue J. and Bengtson, Per},
  issn         = {0038-0717},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {5--13},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Soil Biology & Biochemistry},
  title        = {Spatial variability of soil fungal and bacterial abundance: Consequences for carbon turnover along a transition from a forested to clear-cut site},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2013.03.015},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.soilbio.2013.03.015},
  volume       = {63},
  year         = {2013},
}