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Tracking of physical activity with accelerometers over a 2-year time period

Dencker, Magnus LU ; Tanha, Tina LU ; Wollmer, Per LU ; Karlsson, Magnus K. LU ; Andersen, Lars Bo and Thorsson, Ola LU (2013) In Journal of Physical Activity and Health 10(2). p.241-248
Abstract

Background: Limited data exist of tracking and changes in accelerometer-measured physical activity in children. Methods: Physical activity was assessed by accelerometers for 4 days in 167 children (boys, n = 90; girls n = 77) age 9.8 ± 0.6 years. Follow-up measurement was made 2.0 ± 0.1 yrs later (range 1.9-2.1 yrs). General physical activity (GPA) was defined as mean count/minute. Minutes of inactivity; light, moderate, and vigorous physical activity (LMVPA); moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA); and vigorous physical activity (VPA) per day were calculated both as absolute values and as percentage of total registration time. Results: Spearman rank order correlation indicated low tracking of MVPA and VPA in girls (r =... (More)

Background: Limited data exist of tracking and changes in accelerometer-measured physical activity in children. Methods: Physical activity was assessed by accelerometers for 4 days in 167 children (boys, n = 90; girls n = 77) age 9.8 ± 0.6 years. Follow-up measurement was made 2.0 ± 0.1 yrs later (range 1.9-2.1 yrs). General physical activity (GPA) was defined as mean count/minute. Minutes of inactivity; light, moderate, and vigorous physical activity (LMVPA); moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA); and vigorous physical activity (VPA) per day were calculated both as absolute values and as percentage of total registration time. Results: Spearman rank order correlation indicated low tracking of MVPA and VPA in girls (r = .25-0.33, P < .05), and low-moderate tracking of GPA, inactivity, LMVPA, MVPA and VPA in boys (r = .23-0.40, P < .05). Time in inactivity increased at follow-up by 5%-14%. Most of the assessed physical activity variables were decreased at follow-up by 6% to 30%. Conclusions: Physical activity tracks at a low-moderate degree from age 10-12 years, which confirm previous investigations that have used self-report assessments. The lowmoderate tracking of physical activity variables indicate that those who were most active initially remained most active. Increasing inactive behavior was observed and that several other physical activity variables were decreased at follow-up.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Accelerometry, Children, Daily physical activity
in
Journal of Physical Activity and Health
volume
10
issue
2
pages
241 - 248
publisher
Human Kinetics, Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:84873330363
ISSN
1543-3080
DOI
10.1123/jpah.10.2.241
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
3a2d9e82-0185-4f31-b9dc-9b733a4140f6
date added to LUP
2019-05-21 21:02:18
date last changed
2019-11-20 05:44:44
@article{3a2d9e82-0185-4f31-b9dc-9b733a4140f6,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Limited data exist of tracking and changes in accelerometer-measured physical activity in children. Methods: Physical activity was assessed by accelerometers for 4 days in 167 children (boys, n = 90; girls n = 77) age 9.8 ± 0.6 years. Follow-up measurement was made 2.0 ± 0.1 yrs later (range 1.9-2.1 yrs). General physical activity (GPA) was defined as mean count/minute. Minutes of inactivity; light, moderate, and vigorous physical activity (LMVPA); moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA); and vigorous physical activity (VPA) per day were calculated both as absolute values and as percentage of total registration time. Results: Spearman rank order correlation indicated low tracking of MVPA and VPA in girls (r = .25-0.33, P &lt; .05), and low-moderate tracking of GPA, inactivity, LMVPA, MVPA and VPA in boys (r = .23-0.40, P &lt; .05). Time in inactivity increased at follow-up by 5%-14%. Most of the assessed physical activity variables were decreased at follow-up by 6% to 30%. Conclusions: Physical activity tracks at a low-moderate degree from age 10-12 years, which confirm previous investigations that have used self-report assessments. The lowmoderate tracking of physical activity variables indicate that those who were most active initially remained most active. Increasing inactive behavior was observed and that several other physical activity variables were decreased at follow-up.</p>},
  author       = {Dencker, Magnus and Tanha, Tina and Wollmer, Per and Karlsson, Magnus K. and Andersen, Lars Bo and Thorsson, Ola},
  issn         = {1543-3080},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {241--248},
  publisher    = {Human Kinetics, Inc.},
  series       = {Journal of Physical Activity and Health},
  title        = {Tracking of physical activity with accelerometers over a 2-year time period},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/jpah.10.2.241},
  doi          = {10.1123/jpah.10.2.241},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2013},
}