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University and medical education and the risk of cancer in Sweden

Hemminki, K LU and Li, Xinjun LU (2004) In European Journal of Cancer Prevention 13(3). p.199-205
Abstract

Socio-economic gradients are known to exist in cancer but we want to focus on the university-educated population and specifically on physicians to find out whether their special educational background on cancer causation helps them to avoid cancers. The analysis was based on the latest update of the Swedish Family-Cancer Database, in which the educational level was obtained from the national census of 1970 for those aged 30 years or older and the follow-up for cancer was extended up to year 2000. We determined standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), adjusted for several variables, for cancer among men and women in four educated groups and compared them with those with less than 9 years of education. Total cancer risks did not differ much,... (More)

Socio-economic gradients are known to exist in cancer but we want to focus on the university-educated population and specifically on physicians to find out whether their special educational background on cancer causation helps them to avoid cancers. The analysis was based on the latest update of the Swedish Family-Cancer Database, in which the educational level was obtained from the national census of 1970 for those aged 30 years or older and the follow-up for cancer was extended up to year 2000. We determined standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), adjusted for several variables, for cancer among men and women in four educated groups and compared them with those with less than 9 years of education. Total cancer risks did not differ much, but at individual sites, the university-educated population showed consistent, increasing or decreasing trends. The educated group showed high SIRs for melanoma and skin cancer and for female breast cancer. At all these sites, SIRs for in situ tumours exceeded those for invasive tumours; the highest SIR was 4.81 for male MD, PhDs for in situ melanoma. SIR for in situ breast cancer for female physicians was 1.95. SIR for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma for male MD, PhDs was 2.20 but their risk of stomach cancer was only 0.26. Tobacco-related cancers were decreased among the educated group. Cancer risks for physicians were not different from those of their academic colleagues. Some of the increased risks were probably due to lead-time bias, caused by early diagnosis.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adult, Aged, Databases, Factual, Education, Medical, Educational Status, Female, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms/epidemiology, Physicians, Risk Factors, Smoking/adverse effects, Social Class, Sweden/epidemiology, Universities
in
European Journal of Cancer Prevention
volume
13
issue
3
pages
7 pages
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • scopus:2942655362
ISSN
0959-8278
DOI
10.1097/01.cej.0000130019.70440.7b
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
3ab09bb9-25b8-4156-a841-ba739b37d16b
date added to LUP
2019-01-30 11:42:56
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:45:48
@article{3ab09bb9-25b8-4156-a841-ba739b37d16b,
  abstract     = {<p>Socio-economic gradients are known to exist in cancer but we want to focus on the university-educated population and specifically on physicians to find out whether their special educational background on cancer causation helps them to avoid cancers. The analysis was based on the latest update of the Swedish Family-Cancer Database, in which the educational level was obtained from the national census of 1970 for those aged 30 years or older and the follow-up for cancer was extended up to year 2000. We determined standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), adjusted for several variables, for cancer among men and women in four educated groups and compared them with those with less than 9 years of education. Total cancer risks did not differ much, but at individual sites, the university-educated population showed consistent, increasing or decreasing trends. The educated group showed high SIRs for melanoma and skin cancer and for female breast cancer. At all these sites, SIRs for in situ tumours exceeded those for invasive tumours; the highest SIR was 4.81 for male MD, PhDs for in situ melanoma. SIR for in situ breast cancer for female physicians was 1.95. SIR for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma for male MD, PhDs was 2.20 but their risk of stomach cancer was only 0.26. Tobacco-related cancers were decreased among the educated group. Cancer risks for physicians were not different from those of their academic colleagues. Some of the increased risks were probably due to lead-time bias, caused by early diagnosis.</p>},
  author       = {Hemminki, K and Li, Xinjun},
  issn         = {0959-8278},
  keyword      = {Adult,Aged,Databases, Factual,Education, Medical,Educational Status,Female,Humans,Incidence,Male,Middle Aged,Neoplasms/epidemiology,Physicians,Risk Factors,Smoking/adverse effects,Social Class,Sweden/epidemiology,Universities},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {199--205},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {European Journal of Cancer Prevention},
  title        = {University and medical education and the risk of cancer in Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.cej.0000130019.70440.7b},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2004},
}