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Coaching interprofessional health care improvement teams: the coachee, the coach and the leader perspectives.

Godfrey, MM; Andersson-Gare, B; Nelson, EC; Nilsson, M and Ahlström, Gerd LU (2014) In Journal of Nursing Management 22(4). p.452-464
Abstract
Aim

To investigate health care improvement team coaching activities from the perspectives of coachees, coaches and unit leaders in two national improvement collaboratives.



Background

Despite numerous methods to improve health care, inconsistencies in success have been attributed to factors that include unengaged staff, absence of supportive improvement resources and organisational inertia.



Methods

Mixed methods sequential exploratory study design, including quantitative and qualitative data from interprofessional improvement teams who received team coaching. The coachees (n = 382), coaches (n = 9) and leaders (n = 30) completed three different data collection tools... (More)
Aim

To investigate health care improvement team coaching activities from the perspectives of coachees, coaches and unit leaders in two national improvement collaboratives.



Background

Despite numerous methods to improve health care, inconsistencies in success have been attributed to factors that include unengaged staff, absence of supportive improvement resources and organisational inertia.



Methods

Mixed methods sequential exploratory study design, including quantitative and qualitative data from interprofessional improvement teams who received team coaching. The coachees (n = 382), coaches (n = 9) and leaders (n = 30) completed three different data collection tools identifying coaching actions perceived to support improvement activities.



Results

Coachees, coaches and unit leaders in both collaboratives reported generally positive perceptions about team coaching. Four categories of coaching actions were perceived to support improvement work: context, relationships, helping and technical support.



Conclusions

All participants agreed that regardless of who the coach is, emphasis should include the four categories of team coaching actions.



Implications for nursing management

Leaders should reflect on their efforts to support improvement teams and consider the four categories of team coaching actions. A structured team coaching model that offers needed encouragement to keep the team energized, seems to support health care improvement. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
coaching, collaboratives, facilitation, health care quality improvement, interprofessional teams, leadership
categories
Higher Education
in
Journal of Nursing Management
volume
22
issue
4
pages
452 - 464
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000335520500006
  • scopus:84899995047
ISSN
1365-2834
DOI
10.1111/jonm.12068
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
424e0e90-5ebb-4b03-b50c-30093769ba46 (old id 4022304)
date added to LUP
2013-09-09 14:30:21
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:06:33
@article{424e0e90-5ebb-4b03-b50c-30093769ba46,
  abstract     = {Aim<br/><br>
To investigate health care improvement team coaching activities from the perspectives of coachees, coaches and unit leaders in two national improvement collaboratives.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Background<br/><br>
Despite numerous methods to improve health care, inconsistencies in success have been attributed to factors that include unengaged staff, absence of supportive improvement resources and organisational inertia.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods<br/><br>
Mixed methods sequential exploratory study design, including quantitative and qualitative data from interprofessional improvement teams who received team coaching. The coachees (n = 382), coaches (n = 9) and leaders (n = 30) completed three different data collection tools identifying coaching actions perceived to support improvement activities.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results<br/><br>
Coachees, coaches and unit leaders in both collaboratives reported generally positive perceptions about team coaching. Four categories of coaching actions were perceived to support improvement work: context, relationships, helping and technical support.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions<br/><br>
All participants agreed that regardless of who the coach is, emphasis should include the four categories of team coaching actions.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Implications for nursing management<br/><br>
Leaders should reflect on their efforts to support improvement teams and consider the four categories of team coaching actions. A structured team coaching model that offers needed encouragement to keep the team energized, seems to support health care improvement.},
  author       = {Godfrey, MM and Andersson-Gare, B and Nelson, EC and Nilsson, M and Ahlström, Gerd},
  issn         = {1365-2834},
  keyword      = {coaching,collaboratives,facilitation,health care quality improvement,interprofessional teams,leadership},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {452--464},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Nursing Management},
  title        = {Coaching interprofessional health care improvement teams: the coachee, the coach and the leader perspectives.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jonm.12068},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2014},
}