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Plant-climate interactions over historical and geological time

Cowling, Sharon A LU (2000)
Abstract
Data-model comparisons are a useful approach to elucidating the relative influence of past climate change on vegetation dynamics over various spatial global, regional, stand) and temporal (historical, geological) scales. Comparisons between changes in tree species abundance reconstructed from pollen and simulated from a forest gap model, for example, indicate that based solely on climate change over the past 1500 years, southern Scandinavian forests should be co-dominated by Tilia and Fagus. Picea has begun to more closely track changes in climate since 1000 years ago, however in the last few centuries the realised range limit of Picea has overshot the potential limit because of planting and establishment during favourable years. Not only... (More)
Data-model comparisons are a useful approach to elucidating the relative influence of past climate change on vegetation dynamics over various spatial global, regional, stand) and temporal (historical, geological) scales. Comparisons between changes in tree species abundance reconstructed from pollen and simulated from a forest gap model, for example, indicate that based solely on climate change over the past 1500 years, southern Scandinavian forests should be co-dominated by Tilia and Fagus. Picea has begun to more closely track changes in climate since 1000 years ago, however in the last few centuries the realised range limit of Picea has overshot the potential limit because of planting and establishment during favourable years. Not only can palaeodata-model comparisons provide practical information for forest managers, but they can help further our appreciation of the climatic catalysts underlying evolution of terrestrial ecosystems. Past changes in atmospheric CO2, independently or in combin- ation with changes in climate, may have altered vegetation form and function such that palaeoplant assemblages were much different than today, speciation may have been promoted via biological vicariance, and some species may have been pushed to extinction. A thorough understanding of modern plant-climate interactions requires consideration of how past climate and atmospheric CO2 events could have shaped physiological, biochemical and biophysical functioning of existing vegetation. (Less)
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author
opponent
  • Professor Prentice, I. Colin, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Germany
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
keywords
atmospheric CO2, plant evolution, palaeoecology, plant-climate interactions, vegetation modelling, Plant ecology, Växtekologi
pages
216 pages
publisher
Climate Impacts Group, Institute of Ecology, Plant Ecology, Lund University, Sweden
defense location
Blå Hallen, Institute of Ecology
defense date
2000-05-18 10:00
external identifiers
  • other:ISRN: SE-LundBDS/NBBE-00/1058+216pp
ISBN
91-7105-138-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0ac55de6-e50f-4814-b191-ee45d62bac00 (old id 40473)
date added to LUP
2007-06-20 12:27:46
date last changed
2016-09-19 08:45:03
@phdthesis{0ac55de6-e50f-4814-b191-ee45d62bac00,
  abstract     = {Data-model comparisons are a useful approach to elucidating the relative influence of past climate change on vegetation dynamics over various spatial global, regional, stand) and temporal (historical, geological) scales. Comparisons between changes in tree species abundance reconstructed from pollen and simulated from a forest gap model, for example, indicate that based solely on climate change over the past 1500 years, southern Scandinavian forests should be co-dominated by Tilia and Fagus. Picea has begun to more closely track changes in climate since 1000 years ago, however in the last few centuries the realised range limit of Picea has overshot the potential limit because of planting and establishment during favourable years. Not only can palaeodata-model comparisons provide practical information for forest managers, but they can help further our appreciation of the climatic catalysts underlying evolution of terrestrial ecosystems. Past changes in atmospheric CO2, independently or in combin- ation with changes in climate, may have altered vegetation form and function such that palaeoplant assemblages were much different than today, speciation may have been promoted via biological vicariance, and some species may have been pushed to extinction. A thorough understanding of modern plant-climate interactions requires consideration of how past climate and atmospheric CO2 events could have shaped physiological, biochemical and biophysical functioning of existing vegetation.},
  author       = {Cowling, Sharon A},
  isbn         = {91-7105-138-4},
  keyword      = {atmospheric CO2,plant evolution,palaeoecology,plant-climate interactions,vegetation modelling,Plant ecology,Växtekologi},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {216},
  publisher    = {Climate Impacts Group, Institute of Ecology, Plant Ecology, Lund University, Sweden},
  school       = {Lund University},
  title        = {Plant-climate interactions over historical and geological time},
  year         = {2000},
}