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Permanent Hypoparathyroidism After Total Thyroidectomy in Children : Results from a National Registry

Nordenström, Erik LU ; Bergenfelz, Anders LU and Almquist, Martin LU (2018) In World Journal of Surgery 42(9). p.2858-2863
Abstract

Introduction: Hypoparathyroidism is the most common complication following thyroidectomy. There are few population-based reports on the rate of hypoparathyroidism in children. The incidence of medical treatment of permanent hypoparathyroidism in children is reported using a national registry. Methods: The study population included patients below 18 years of age undergoing total thyroidectomy reported to the Scandinavian Quality Registry for Thyroid, Parathyroid and Adrenal Surgery 2004–2014. Patients with previous thyroid or parathyroid surgery or treatment with vitamin D before surgery were excluded from analysis. Permanent postoperative hypoparathyroidism was defined as treatment with vitamin D for more than 6 months after... (More)

Introduction: Hypoparathyroidism is the most common complication following thyroidectomy. There are few population-based reports on the rate of hypoparathyroidism in children. The incidence of medical treatment of permanent hypoparathyroidism in children is reported using a national registry. Methods: The study population included patients below 18 years of age undergoing total thyroidectomy reported to the Scandinavian Quality Registry for Thyroid, Parathyroid and Adrenal Surgery 2004–2014. Patients with previous thyroid or parathyroid surgery or treatment with vitamin D before surgery were excluded from analysis. Permanent postoperative hypoparathyroidism was defined as treatment with vitamin D for more than 6 months after thyroidectomy. Risk factors for permanent hypoparathyroidism were calculated with uni- and multivariable logistic regression. Using data from the Swedish Inpatient Registry, rates of readmissions and annual number of days in hospital after total thyroidectomy were compared between patients with and without permanent hypoparathyroidism. Results: Some 274 children (215 girls and 59 boys) underwent total thyroidectomy. The median age was 14 (range 0–17) years. Indications for surgery were Graves’ disease (214, 78.1%), other benign disease (27, 9.9%) and thyroid cancer (33, 12%). Median follow-up was 4.8 years. Twenty (7.3%) children developed permanent hypoparathyroidism. No statistically significant risk factors for permanent hypoparathyroidism were identified. Rates of readmission and annual number of days in hospital after discharge were similar in patients with and without permanent hypoparathyroidism. Conclusions: The rate of permanent hypoparathyroidism following total thyroidectomy in children was high and is a cause of concern.

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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
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in
World Journal of Surgery
volume
42
issue
9
pages
2858 - 2863
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85042357820
  • pmid:29470698
ISSN
0364-2313
DOI
10.1007/s00268-018-4552-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4097cb27-7ac9-4037-a9ea-27627523355e
date added to LUP
2018-03-08 15:47:38
date last changed
2021-10-06 05:34:10
@article{4097cb27-7ac9-4037-a9ea-27627523355e,
  abstract     = {<p>Introduction: Hypoparathyroidism is the most common complication following thyroidectomy. There are few population-based reports on the rate of hypoparathyroidism in children. The incidence of medical treatment of permanent hypoparathyroidism in children is reported using a national registry. Methods: The study population included patients below 18 years of age undergoing total thyroidectomy reported to the Scandinavian Quality Registry for Thyroid, Parathyroid and Adrenal Surgery 2004–2014. Patients with previous thyroid or parathyroid surgery or treatment with vitamin D before surgery were excluded from analysis. Permanent postoperative hypoparathyroidism was defined as treatment with vitamin D for more than 6 months after thyroidectomy. Risk factors for permanent hypoparathyroidism were calculated with uni- and multivariable logistic regression. Using data from the Swedish Inpatient Registry, rates of readmissions and annual number of days in hospital after total thyroidectomy were compared between patients with and without permanent hypoparathyroidism. Results: Some 274 children (215 girls and 59 boys) underwent total thyroidectomy. The median age was 14 (range 0–17) years. Indications for surgery were Graves’ disease (214, 78.1%), other benign disease (27, 9.9%) and thyroid cancer (33, 12%). Median follow-up was 4.8 years. Twenty (7.3%) children developed permanent hypoparathyroidism. No statistically significant risk factors for permanent hypoparathyroidism were identified. Rates of readmission and annual number of days in hospital after discharge were similar in patients with and without permanent hypoparathyroidism. Conclusions: The rate of permanent hypoparathyroidism following total thyroidectomy in children was high and is a cause of concern.</p>},
  author       = {Nordenström, Erik and Bergenfelz, Anders and Almquist, Martin},
  issn         = {0364-2313},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {2858--2863},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {World Journal of Surgery},
  title        = {Permanent Hypoparathyroidism After Total Thyroidectomy in Children : Results from a National Registry},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00268-018-4552-7},
  doi          = {10.1007/s00268-018-4552-7},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2018},
}