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Strategies for consumer control of complex product forms in generative design systems

Nordin, Axel LU ; Motte, Damien LU and Bjärnemo, Robert LU (2013) 39th Design Automation Conference - DETC/DAC'13 In Proceedings of the 39th Design Automation Conference - DETC/DAC'13 3A. p.03-029
Abstract
In recent years, the number of products that can be tailored to consumers' needs and desires has increased dramatically; there are many opportunities to individualize the colors, materials or options of products. However, current trends indicate that the future consumer will not be satisfied with mere material and color choices, but will desire control over form as well. While it is technically feasible to allow consumers to partially mass-customize the form of products subject to functional and production constraints through the use of a generative design system, the question of how the control of form should be presented to the user arises. The issue becomes especially important when the product form is based on complex morphologies,... (More)
In recent years, the number of products that can be tailored to consumers' needs and desires has increased dramatically; there are many opportunities to individualize the colors, materials or options of products. However, current trends indicate that the future consumer will not be satisfied with mere material and color choices, but will desire control over form as well. While it is technically feasible to allow consumers to partially mass-customize the form of products subject to functional and production constraints through the use of a generative design system, the question of how the control of form should be presented to the user arises. The issue becomes especially important when the product form is based on complex morphologies, which require in-depth knowledge of their parameters to be able to control them fully. In this paper, we discuss this issue and present and test two strategies for controlling complex forms in consumer-oriented generative design systems, one offering the user full control over the design ("total control" strategy), while the other automatically generates designs for the user ("no control" strategy). The implementation of those two control strategies in a generative design system for two categories of products (bookshelf and table) and five types of morphologies are described and tested with a number of design interested participants to estimate their level of satisfaction with the two control strategies. The empirical study shows that the participants enjoyed both the total control and no control strategies. The development of the full control modes for the five morphologies was on the other hand not straightforward, and in general, making the controls meaningful to the consumer can be difficult with complex morphologies. It seems that a consumer-oriented generative design system with two different control strategies, as the ones presented in this article, would offer the most satisfaction. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Mass customization, Co-design, Chinese Lattice, Voronoi diagram, Tessellations, Industrial design, Machine Design, Renaissance 2.0, maskinkonstruktion
in
Proceedings of the 39th Design Automation Conference - DETC/DAC'13
volume
3A
pages
10 pages
publisher
American Society Of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
conference name
39th Design Automation Conference - DETC/DAC'13
external identifiers
  • WOS:000362380000029
  • Scopus:84896920920
ISBN
978-0-7918-5588-1
DOI
10.1115/DETC2013-12886
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
699234e3-aa70-4d8e-9d67-e86ce50f327a (old id 4113334)
date added to LUP
2014-01-14 09:57:50
date last changed
2017-02-19 04:30:13
@inproceedings{699234e3-aa70-4d8e-9d67-e86ce50f327a,
  abstract     = {In recent years, the number of products that can be tailored to consumers' needs and desires has increased dramatically; there are many opportunities to individualize the colors, materials or options of products. However, current trends indicate that the future consumer will not be satisfied with mere material and color choices, but will desire control over form as well. While it is technically feasible to allow consumers to partially mass-customize the form of products subject to functional and production constraints through the use of a generative design system, the question of how the control of form should be presented to the user arises. The issue becomes especially important when the product form is based on complex morphologies, which require in-depth knowledge of their parameters to be able to control them fully. In this paper, we discuss this issue and present and test two strategies for controlling complex forms in consumer-oriented generative design systems, one offering the user full control over the design ("total control" strategy), while the other automatically generates designs for the user ("no control" strategy). The implementation of those two control strategies in a generative design system for two categories of products (bookshelf and table) and five types of morphologies are described and tested with a number of design interested participants to estimate their level of satisfaction with the two control strategies. The empirical study shows that the participants enjoyed both the total control and no control strategies. The development of the full control modes for the five morphologies was on the other hand not straightforward, and in general, making the controls meaningful to the consumer can be difficult with complex morphologies. It seems that a consumer-oriented generative design system with two different control strategies, as the ones presented in this article, would offer the most satisfaction.},
  author       = {Nordin, Axel and Motte, Damien and Bjärnemo, Robert},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of the 39th Design Automation Conference - DETC/DAC'13},
  isbn         = {978-0-7918-5588-1},
  keyword      = {Mass customization,Co-design,Chinese Lattice,Voronoi diagram,Tessellations,Industrial design,Machine Design,Renaissance 2.0,maskinkonstruktion},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {03--029},
  publisher    = {American Society Of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)},
  title        = {Strategies for consumer control of complex product forms in generative design systems},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/DETC2013-12886},
  volume       = {3A},
  year         = {2013},
}