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A Pediatric Bone Mass Scan Has Poor Ability to Predict Adult Bone Mass: A 28-Year Prospective Study in 214 Children.

Buttazzoni, Christian LU ; Rosengren, Björn LU ; Tveit, Magnus LU ; Landin, Lennart LU ; Nilsson, Jan-Åke LU and Karlsson, Magnus LU (2014) In Calcified Tissue International 94(2). p.232-239
Abstract
As the correlation of bone mass from childhood to adulthood is unclear, we conducted a long-term prospective observational study to determine if a pediatric bone mass scan could predict adult bone mass. We measured cortical bone mineral content (BMC [g]), bone mineral density (BMD [g/cm(2)]), and bone width (cm) in the distal forearm by single photon absorptiometry in 120 boys and 94 girls with a mean age of 10 years (range 3-17) and mean 28 years (range 25-29) later. We calculated individual and age-specific bone mass Z scores, using the control cohort included at baseline as reference, and evaluated correlations between the two measurements with Pearson's correlation coefficient. Individual Z scores were also stratified in quartiles to... (More)
As the correlation of bone mass from childhood to adulthood is unclear, we conducted a long-term prospective observational study to determine if a pediatric bone mass scan could predict adult bone mass. We measured cortical bone mineral content (BMC [g]), bone mineral density (BMD [g/cm(2)]), and bone width (cm) in the distal forearm by single photon absorptiometry in 120 boys and 94 girls with a mean age of 10 years (range 3-17) and mean 28 years (range 25-29) later. We calculated individual and age-specific bone mass Z scores, using the control cohort included at baseline as reference, and evaluated correlations between the two measurements with Pearson's correlation coefficient. Individual Z scores were also stratified in quartiles to register movements between quartiles from growth to adulthood. BMD Z scores in childhood and adulthood correlated in both boys (r = 0.35, p < 0.0001) and girls (r = 0.50, p < 0.0001) and in both children ≥10 years at baseline (boys r = 0.43 and girls r = 0.58, both p < 0.0001) and children <10 years at baseline (boys r = 0.26 and girls r = 0.40, both p < 0.05). Of the children in the lowest quartile of BMD, 58 % had left the lowest quartile in adulthood. A pediatric bone scan with a value in the lowest quartile had a sensitivity of 48 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 27-69 %) and a specificity of 76 % (95 % CI 66-84 %) to identify individuals who would remain in the lowest quartile also in adulthood. Childhood forearm BMD explained 12 % of the variance in adult BMD in men and 25 % in women. A pediatric distal forearm BMD scan has poor ability to predict adult bone mass. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Calcified Tissue International
volume
94
issue
2
pages
232 - 239
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:24101230
  • wos:000330827700012
  • scopus:84893278568
ISSN
1432-0827
DOI
10.1007/s00223-013-9802-y
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0309daf1-86ba-4936-b896-aca26a160208 (old id 4143593)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24101230?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2013-11-02 22:10:21
date last changed
2017-09-24 03:20:15
@article{0309daf1-86ba-4936-b896-aca26a160208,
  abstract     = {As the correlation of bone mass from childhood to adulthood is unclear, we conducted a long-term prospective observational study to determine if a pediatric bone mass scan could predict adult bone mass. We measured cortical bone mineral content (BMC [g]), bone mineral density (BMD [g/cm(2)]), and bone width (cm) in the distal forearm by single photon absorptiometry in 120 boys and 94 girls with a mean age of 10 years (range 3-17) and mean 28 years (range 25-29) later. We calculated individual and age-specific bone mass Z scores, using the control cohort included at baseline as reference, and evaluated correlations between the two measurements with Pearson's correlation coefficient. Individual Z scores were also stratified in quartiles to register movements between quartiles from growth to adulthood. BMD Z scores in childhood and adulthood correlated in both boys (r = 0.35, p &lt; 0.0001) and girls (r = 0.50, p &lt; 0.0001) and in both children ≥10 years at baseline (boys r = 0.43 and girls r = 0.58, both p &lt; 0.0001) and children &lt;10 years at baseline (boys r = 0.26 and girls r = 0.40, both p &lt; 0.05). Of the children in the lowest quartile of BMD, 58 % had left the lowest quartile in adulthood. A pediatric bone scan with a value in the lowest quartile had a sensitivity of 48 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 27-69 %) and a specificity of 76 % (95 % CI 66-84 %) to identify individuals who would remain in the lowest quartile also in adulthood. Childhood forearm BMD explained 12 % of the variance in adult BMD in men and 25 % in women. A pediatric distal forearm BMD scan has poor ability to predict adult bone mass.},
  author       = {Buttazzoni, Christian and Rosengren, Björn and Tveit, Magnus and Landin, Lennart and Nilsson, Jan-Åke and Karlsson, Magnus},
  issn         = {1432-0827},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {232--239},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Calcified Tissue International},
  title        = {A Pediatric Bone Mass Scan Has Poor Ability to Predict Adult Bone Mass: A 28-Year Prospective Study in 214 Children.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00223-013-9802-y},
  volume       = {94},
  year         = {2014},
}