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Agglomeration Economies in Classical Music

Borowiecki, Karol Jan LU (2015) In Papers in Regional Science 94(3). p.443-468
Abstract
This study investigates agglomeration effects for classical music production in a wide range of cities for a global sample of composers born between 1750 and 1899. Theory suggests a trade-off between agglomeration economies (peer effects) and diseconomies (peer crowding). I test this hypothesis using historical data on composers and employ a unique instrumental variable - a measure of birth centrality, calculated as the average distance between a composer´s birthplace and the birthplace of his peers. I find a strong causal impact of peer group size on the number of important compositions written in a given year. Consistent with theory, the productivity gain eventually decreases and is characterized by an inverted U-shaped relationship.... (More)
This study investigates agglomeration effects for classical music production in a wide range of cities for a global sample of composers born between 1750 and 1899. Theory suggests a trade-off between agglomeration economies (peer effects) and diseconomies (peer crowding). I test this hypothesis using historical data on composers and employ a unique instrumental variable - a measure of birth centrality, calculated as the average distance between a composer´s birthplace and the birthplace of his peers. I find a strong causal impact of peer group size on the number of important compositions written in a given year. Consistent with theory, the productivity gain eventually decreases and is characterized by an inverted U-shaped relationship. These results are robust to a large series of tests, including checks for quality of peers, city characteristics, various measures of composers´ productivity, and across different estimations in which also time-varying birth centrality measures are used as instrumental variables. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to specialist publication or newspaper
publication status
published
subject
categories
Popular Science
in
Papers in Regional Science
volume
94
issue
3
pages
443 - 468
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000359872200001
  • scopus:84938535784
ISSN
1056-8190
DOI
10.1111/pirs.12078
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
67892eb2-13c1-4d22-858f-417aab3a3f30 (old id 4146080)
date added to LUP
2013-11-08 14:00:25
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:56:24
@misc{67892eb2-13c1-4d22-858f-417aab3a3f30,
  abstract     = {This study investigates agglomeration effects for classical music production in a wide range of cities for a global sample of composers born between 1750 and 1899. Theory suggests a trade-off between agglomeration economies (peer effects) and diseconomies (peer crowding). I test this hypothesis using historical data on composers and employ a unique instrumental variable - a measure of birth centrality, calculated as the average distance between a composer´s birthplace and the birthplace of his peers. I find a strong causal impact of peer group size on the number of important compositions written in a given year. Consistent with theory, the productivity gain eventually decreases and is characterized by an inverted U-shaped relationship. These results are robust to a large series of tests, including checks for quality of peers, city characteristics, various measures of composers´ productivity, and across different estimations in which also time-varying birth centrality measures are used as instrumental variables.},
  author       = {Borowiecki, Karol Jan},
  issn         = {1056-8190},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {443--468},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Papers in Regional Science},
  title        = {Agglomeration Economies in Classical Music},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pirs.12078},
  volume       = {94},
  year         = {2015},
}