Skip to main content

Lund University Publications

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Visual adaptations in the night-active Wasp Apoica pallens

Greiner, Birgit (2006) In Journal of Comparative Neurology 495(3). p.255-262
Abstract
The apposition compound eye of the nocturnal polistine wasp Apoica pallens shows, in comparison to the closely related diurnal wasp Polistes occidentalis, specific adaptations to vision at low light intensities. When considering recent work on nocturnal and diurnal bees, general principles for dim-light vision in hymenopterans become evident: The rhabdom diameters in nocturnal bees and wasps are 4 times wider compared to their diurnal relatives, leading to wide receptive fields, which in turn account for a 25-fold higher optical sensitivity. Interestingly, the rhabdom diameters in both nocturnal bees and wasps measure 8 mu m, which may represent the maximum width for nocturnal hymenopteran apposition eyes. A ratio of 1.8 times larger eyes... (More)
The apposition compound eye of the nocturnal polistine wasp Apoica pallens shows, in comparison to the closely related diurnal wasp Polistes occidentalis, specific adaptations to vision at low light intensities. When considering recent work on nocturnal and diurnal bees, general principles for dim-light vision in hymenopterans become evident: The rhabdom diameters in nocturnal bees and wasps are 4 times wider compared to their diurnal relatives, leading to wide receptive fields, which in turn account for a 25-fold higher optical sensitivity. Interestingly, the rhabdom diameters in both nocturnal bees and wasps measure 8 mu m, which may represent the maximum width for nocturnal hymenopteran apposition eyes. A ratio of 1.8 times larger eyes is present in the nocturnal bees and wasps, which in A. pallens is achieved by increasing the facet number, instead of enlarging the facets, as in nocturnal bees. Although this initially indicates spatial resolution to be important for the nocturnal wasp, the wide receptive fields of the rhabdoms will reduce its potentially high acuity. As the optical sensitivity alone cannot account for the 8 log units intensity difference between day and night, a possible role of neural summation within the first optic ganglion (lamina) of nocturnal hymenopterans is discussed. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
optical sensitivity, structure, retina, apposition compound eye, hymenopterans, nocturnal vision
in
Journal of Comparative Neurology
volume
495
issue
3
pages
255 - 262
publisher
John Wiley and Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:16440299
  • wos:000235463900001
  • scopus:33144488037
  • pmid:16440299
ISSN
1096-9861
DOI
10.1002/cne.20882
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Zoology (Closed 2011) (011012000)
id
ac5ac4e5-19de-4b71-b95c-222660337764 (old id 417413)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:54:44
date last changed
2021-04-13 01:34:45
@article{ac5ac4e5-19de-4b71-b95c-222660337764,
  abstract     = {The apposition compound eye of the nocturnal polistine wasp Apoica pallens shows, in comparison to the closely related diurnal wasp Polistes occidentalis, specific adaptations to vision at low light intensities. When considering recent work on nocturnal and diurnal bees, general principles for dim-light vision in hymenopterans become evident: The rhabdom diameters in nocturnal bees and wasps are 4 times wider compared to their diurnal relatives, leading to wide receptive fields, which in turn account for a 25-fold higher optical sensitivity. Interestingly, the rhabdom diameters in both nocturnal bees and wasps measure 8 mu m, which may represent the maximum width for nocturnal hymenopteran apposition eyes. A ratio of 1.8 times larger eyes is present in the nocturnal bees and wasps, which in A. pallens is achieved by increasing the facet number, instead of enlarging the facets, as in nocturnal bees. Although this initially indicates spatial resolution to be important for the nocturnal wasp, the wide receptive fields of the rhabdoms will reduce its potentially high acuity. As the optical sensitivity alone cannot account for the 8 log units intensity difference between day and night, a possible role of neural summation within the first optic ganglion (lamina) of nocturnal hymenopterans is discussed.},
  author       = {Greiner, Birgit},
  issn         = {1096-9861},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {255--262},
  publisher    = {John Wiley and Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Comparative Neurology},
  title        = {Visual adaptations in the night-active Wasp Apoica pallens},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cne.20882},
  doi          = {10.1002/cne.20882},
  volume       = {495},
  year         = {2006},
}