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Results of the first WHO international collaborative study on the standardization of the detection of antibodies to human papillomaviruses

Ferguson, M ; Heath, A ; Johnes, S ; Pagliusi, S and Dillner, Joakim LU (2006) In International Journal of Cancer 118(6). p.1508-1514
Abstract
Detection of genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid antibody in serum suggests past HPV infection. Also, these antibodies appear to correlate with vaccine-induced protection against infection, at least in animal models. However, each laboratory defines a reactive result differently and there is no agreed definition of what level of response indicates sero-reactivity. Standardization of assays for HPV capsid antibody will therefore assist with HPV vaccine development and epidemiology. This study was undertaken to investigate the specificity and sensitivity of assays in current use for measuring antibody to the major viral capsid protein L1 of HPV. Ten laboratories from 8 countries each analyzed 12 coded serum samples, which... (More)
Detection of genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid antibody in serum suggests past HPV infection. Also, these antibodies appear to correlate with vaccine-induced protection against infection, at least in animal models. However, each laboratory defines a reactive result differently and there is no agreed definition of what level of response indicates sero-reactivity. Standardization of assays for HPV capsid antibody will therefore assist with HPV vaccine development and epidemiology. This study was undertaken to investigate the specificity and sensitivity of assays in current use for measuring antibody to the major viral capsid protein L1 of HPV. Ten laboratories from 8 countries each analyzed 12 coded serum samples, which were derived from an uninfected woman, from naturally infected women and from individuals immunized with different vaccine candidates currently under clinical development. Study samples were assayed by methods in routine use in the participating laboratories. Nine assays were based on virus-like particles (VLPs) of I or more HPV genotypes. One laboratory used bacterially expressed major capsid protein L1 of HPV genotypes as antigen. There was considerable interlaboratory variation in estimated antibody levels. However, ranking of the potency of HPV 16 reactivity across the 12 test sera was consistent for all 10 laboratories. Expression of HPV 16 antibody levels relative to that of a single serum sample from an HPV16-infected woman considerably improved the interlaboratory assay comparability. Establishment of an International Standard for antibodies to HPV 16 would therefore facilitate the comparison of HPV antibody measurements between laboratories and assays. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. (Less)
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author
; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
antibody, standardization, human papilloma virus, VLPs
in
International Journal of Cancer
volume
118
issue
6
pages
1508 - 1514
publisher
John Wiley and Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000235477100024
  • scopus:33644532837
  • pmid:16184553
ISSN
0020-7136
DOI
10.1002/ijc.21515
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2f4ce53e-c5ff-4d8e-af49-5ea71e4a13f1 (old id 417494)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:45:16
date last changed
2021-10-03 04:10:56
@article{2f4ce53e-c5ff-4d8e-af49-5ea71e4a13f1,
  abstract     = {Detection of genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid antibody in serum suggests past HPV infection. Also, these antibodies appear to correlate with vaccine-induced protection against infection, at least in animal models. However, each laboratory defines a reactive result differently and there is no agreed definition of what level of response indicates sero-reactivity. Standardization of assays for HPV capsid antibody will therefore assist with HPV vaccine development and epidemiology. This study was undertaken to investigate the specificity and sensitivity of assays in current use for measuring antibody to the major viral capsid protein L1 of HPV. Ten laboratories from 8 countries each analyzed 12 coded serum samples, which were derived from an uninfected woman, from naturally infected women and from individuals immunized with different vaccine candidates currently under clinical development. Study samples were assayed by methods in routine use in the participating laboratories. Nine assays were based on virus-like particles (VLPs) of I or more HPV genotypes. One laboratory used bacterially expressed major capsid protein L1 of HPV genotypes as antigen. There was considerable interlaboratory variation in estimated antibody levels. However, ranking of the potency of HPV 16 reactivity across the 12 test sera was consistent for all 10 laboratories. Expression of HPV 16 antibody levels relative to that of a single serum sample from an HPV16-infected woman considerably improved the interlaboratory assay comparability. Establishment of an International Standard for antibodies to HPV 16 would therefore facilitate the comparison of HPV antibody measurements between laboratories and assays. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.},
  author       = {Ferguson, M and Heath, A and Johnes, S and Pagliusi, S and Dillner, Joakim},
  issn         = {0020-7136},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1508--1514},
  publisher    = {John Wiley and Sons},
  series       = {International Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Results of the first WHO international collaborative study on the standardization of the detection of antibodies to human papillomaviruses},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.21515},
  doi          = {10.1002/ijc.21515},
  volume       = {118},
  year         = {2006},
}