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Effects of Dopamine Signaling on Recovery and Inflammation after Ischemic Stroke

Kuric, Enida LU (2014) In Lund University, Faculty of Medicine Doctoral Dissertation Series 2014:4.
Abstract
Ischemic stroke, resulting from occlusion of a brain artery is the most common type of stroke

with a prevalence of 15 million people and the leading cause of long-term disability worldwide.

Importantly, partial spontaneous recovery of lost neurological functions occurs mainly during the

first months after stroke onset, albeit to a limited extent. Recovery has been attributed to mechanisms

of compensation but also by activation of endogenous repair processes. The area surrounding the

infarct has been extensively studied and revealed functional and structural changes, however, the

exact mechanisms underlying functional recovery have not been elucidated. The focus of the present

... (More)
Ischemic stroke, resulting from occlusion of a brain artery is the most common type of stroke

with a prevalence of 15 million people and the leading cause of long-term disability worldwide.

Importantly, partial spontaneous recovery of lost neurological functions occurs mainly during the

first months after stroke onset, albeit to a limited extent. Recovery has been attributed to mechanisms

of compensation but also by activation of endogenous repair processes. The area surrounding the

infarct has been extensively studied and revealed functional and structural changes, however, the

exact mechanisms underlying functional recovery have not been elucidated. The focus of the present

study has been to investigate if levodopa/benserazide treatment, a common medication used as

symptomatic treatment in Parkinson’s disease, affects processes enhancing recovery after stroke.

Importantly levodopa/benserazide treatment also enhanced motor recovery and motor learning in

preliminary stroke trials.

In a reverse translational approach we have demonstrated an improved functional recovery by

levodopa/benserazide treatment in a rat stroke model. We identified astrocytes and immune cells

to respond to the treatment and to be involved in recovery enhancing effects. Among the processes

affected by dopamine signaling were increased levels of the astrocyte derived neurotrophic factor,

glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. In addition, we also demonstrated for the first time that

dopamine signaling modulates inflammatory processes in the postischemic brain and periphery

involving T-cells.

Overall this investigation presents novel data regarding the role of dopamine signaling in the

postischemic brain of relevance for recovery after stroke. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
supervisor
opponent
  • Professor Planas, Anna Maria, Department of Brain Ischemia and Neurodegeneration, Institute for Biomedical Research, Barcelona, Spain
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
in
Lund University, Faculty of Medicine Doctoral Dissertation Series
volume
2014:4
pages
138 pages
publisher
Laboratory for Experimental Brain Research
defense location
Segerfalksalen, BMC, Sölvegatan 17, Lund
defense date
2014-01-17 09:00
ISSN
1652-8220
ISBN
978-91-87651-25-0
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a7c7ac88-6d03-4878-a070-d795312d0ed4 (old id 4195965)
date added to LUP
2013-12-18 15:43:48
date last changed
2016-09-19 08:44:48
@phdthesis{a7c7ac88-6d03-4878-a070-d795312d0ed4,
  abstract     = {Ischemic stroke, resulting from occlusion of a brain artery is the most common type of stroke<br/><br>
with a prevalence of 15 million people and the leading cause of long-term disability worldwide.<br/><br>
Importantly, partial spontaneous recovery of lost neurological functions occurs mainly during the<br/><br>
first months after stroke onset, albeit to a limited extent. Recovery has been attributed to mechanisms<br/><br>
of compensation but also by activation of endogenous repair processes. The area surrounding the<br/><br>
infarct has been extensively studied and revealed functional and structural changes, however, the<br/><br>
exact mechanisms underlying functional recovery have not been elucidated. The focus of the present<br/><br>
study has been to investigate if levodopa/benserazide treatment, a common medication used as<br/><br>
symptomatic treatment in Parkinson’s disease, affects processes enhancing recovery after stroke.<br/><br>
Importantly levodopa/benserazide treatment also enhanced motor recovery and motor learning in<br/><br>
preliminary stroke trials.<br/><br>
In a reverse translational approach we have demonstrated an improved functional recovery by<br/><br>
levodopa/benserazide treatment in a rat stroke model. We identified astrocytes and immune cells<br/><br>
to respond to the treatment and to be involved in recovery enhancing effects. Among the processes<br/><br>
affected by dopamine signaling were increased levels of the astrocyte derived neurotrophic factor,<br/><br>
glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. In addition, we also demonstrated for the first time that<br/><br>
dopamine signaling modulates inflammatory processes in the postischemic brain and periphery<br/><br>
involving T-cells.<br/><br>
Overall this investigation presents novel data regarding the role of dopamine signaling in the<br/><br>
postischemic brain of relevance for recovery after stroke.},
  author       = {Kuric, Enida},
  isbn         = {978-91-87651-25-0},
  issn         = {1652-8220},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {138},
  publisher    = {Laboratory for Experimental Brain Research},
  school       = {Lund University},
  series       = {Lund University, Faculty of Medicine Doctoral Dissertation Series},
  title        = {Effects of Dopamine Signaling on Recovery and Inflammation after Ischemic Stroke},
  volume       = {2014:4},
  year         = {2014},
}