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A Six-Year Exercise Program Improves Skeletal Traits without Affecting Fracture Risk - a Prospective Controlled Study in 2621 Children.

Detter, Fredrik LU ; Rosengren, Björn LU ; Dencker, Magnus LU ; Lorentzon, Mattias; Nilsson, Jan-Åke LU and Karlsson, Magnus LU (2014) In Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 29(6). p.1325-1336
Abstract
Most pediatric exercise intervention studies, that evaluates the effect on skeletal traits include volunteers and follow bone mass for less than three years. We present a population-based six-year controlled exercise intervention study in children with also bone structure and incident fractures as endpoints. Fractures were registered in 417 girls and 500 boys in the intervention group (3969 person-years) and 835 girls and 869 boys in the control group (8245 person-years), all aged 6-9 years at study start, during the six-year study period. Children in the intervention group had 40 minutes daily school physical education (PE) and the control group 60 minutes per week. In a sub-cohort with 78 girls and 111 boys in the intervention group and... (More)
Most pediatric exercise intervention studies, that evaluates the effect on skeletal traits include volunteers and follow bone mass for less than three years. We present a population-based six-year controlled exercise intervention study in children with also bone structure and incident fractures as endpoints. Fractures were registered in 417 girls and 500 boys in the intervention group (3969 person-years) and 835 girls and 869 boys in the control group (8245 person-years), all aged 6-9 years at study start, during the six-year study period. Children in the intervention group had 40 minutes daily school physical education (PE) and the control group 60 minutes per week. In a sub-cohort with 78 girls and 111 boys in the intervention group and 52 girls and 54 boys in the control group, bone mineral density (g/cm(2) ) and bone area (mm(2) ) were measured repeatedly by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) measured bone mass and bone structure at follow-up. There were 21.7 low and moderate energy related fractures per 1000 person-years in the intervention group and 19.8 fractures in the control group, leading to a Rate Ratio (RR) of 1.12 (0.85, 1.46). Girls in the intervention group, in comparison with girls in the control group, had 0.009 g/cm(2) (0.003, 0.015) larger gain annually in spine BMD, 0.07 g (0.014, 0.123) larger gain in femoral neck BMC and 4.0 mm(2) (0.5, 7.8) larger gain in femoral neck area, and at follow-up 24.1 g (7.6, 40.6) higher tibial cortical BMC (g) and 23.9 mm(2) (5.27, 42.6) larger tibial cross-sectional area. Boys with daily PE had 0.006 g/cm(2) (0.002, 0.010) larger gain annually in spine BMD than control boys but at follow-up no higher pQCT values than boys in the control group. Daily PE for six years in at study start 6-9 year old improves bone mass and bone size in girls and bone mass in boys, without affecting the fracture risk. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. (Less)
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Bone and Mineral Research
volume
29
issue
6
pages
1325 - 1336
publisher
AMBMR
external identifiers
  • pmid:24390777
  • wos:000336001500003
  • scopus:84901263885
ISSN
1523-4681
DOI
10.1002/jbmr.2168
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
df4fe574-5e25-4a12-96e4-569cde697c0e (old id 4292017)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24390777?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-02-06 21:03:09
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:15:13
@article{df4fe574-5e25-4a12-96e4-569cde697c0e,
  abstract     = {Most pediatric exercise intervention studies, that evaluates the effect on skeletal traits include volunteers and follow bone mass for less than three years. We present a population-based six-year controlled exercise intervention study in children with also bone structure and incident fractures as endpoints. Fractures were registered in 417 girls and 500 boys in the intervention group (3969 person-years) and 835 girls and 869 boys in the control group (8245 person-years), all aged 6-9 years at study start, during the six-year study period. Children in the intervention group had 40 minutes daily school physical education (PE) and the control group 60 minutes per week. In a sub-cohort with 78 girls and 111 boys in the intervention group and 52 girls and 54 boys in the control group, bone mineral density (g/cm(2) ) and bone area (mm(2) ) were measured repeatedly by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) measured bone mass and bone structure at follow-up. There were 21.7 low and moderate energy related fractures per 1000 person-years in the intervention group and 19.8 fractures in the control group, leading to a Rate Ratio (RR) of 1.12 (0.85, 1.46). Girls in the intervention group, in comparison with girls in the control group, had 0.009 g/cm(2) (0.003, 0.015) larger gain annually in spine BMD, 0.07 g (0.014, 0.123) larger gain in femoral neck BMC and 4.0 mm(2) (0.5, 7.8) larger gain in femoral neck area, and at follow-up 24.1 g (7.6, 40.6) higher tibial cortical BMC (g) and 23.9 mm(2) (5.27, 42.6) larger tibial cross-sectional area. Boys with daily PE had 0.006 g/cm(2) (0.002, 0.010) larger gain annually in spine BMD than control boys but at follow-up no higher pQCT values than boys in the control group. Daily PE for six years in at study start 6-9 year old improves bone mass and bone size in girls and bone mass in boys, without affecting the fracture risk. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.},
  author       = {Detter, Fredrik and Rosengren, Björn and Dencker, Magnus and Lorentzon, Mattias and Nilsson, Jan-Åke and Karlsson, Magnus},
  issn         = {1523-4681},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1325--1336},
  publisher    = {AMBMR},
  series       = {Journal of Bone and Mineral Research},
  title        = {A Six-Year Exercise Program Improves Skeletal Traits without Affecting Fracture Risk - a Prospective Controlled Study in 2621 Children.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.2168},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2014},
}