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SSD: New Challenges for Digital Forensics

Bednar, Peter LU and Katos, Vasilis (2011) ItAIS 2011, Proceedings of the 8th Conference of the Italian Chapter of the Association for Information Systems In Information Systems: a crossroads for Organization, Management, Accounting and Engineering
Abstract
ICT changes continuously and we are used to look at IT in a slightly dif-ferent way every year. Things are developed and manufactured to be smaller and faster but few changes are truly technologically revolutionary. Some changes creep up on us as they arrive under cover of previously known technology. Solid State Disks (SSD) is such a technology. The use of SSD is simple enough and for many purposes it can be used as if it was a normal hard disc but many times faster and with a very much lower power consumption. But, SSD is not an evolution of hard disc technology, it is a completely new technology which imitates the behav-iour of a hard disc. There are major underpinning differences which have serious consequences for security and for... (More)
ICT changes continuously and we are used to look at IT in a slightly dif-ferent way every year. Things are developed and manufactured to be smaller and faster but few changes are truly technologically revolutionary. Some changes creep up on us as they arrive under cover of previously known technology. Solid State Disks (SSD) is such a technology. The use of SSD is simple enough and for many purposes it can be used as if it was a normal hard disc but many times faster and with a very much lower power consumption. But, SSD is not an evolution of hard disc technology, it is a completely new technology which imitates the behav-iour of a hard disc. There are major underpinning differences which have serious consequences for security and for digital forensic. Due to how the SSDs work it is not always certain that deleted data are purged from the disc. On the other hand SSD‟s can sometimes purge data all by themselves even if they are not connected to any interface with only the power on. This means that normal guidelines aimed at hard discs for how to preserve digital forensic evidence are not just inappropri-ate but could if followed result in potential evidence being lost, destroyed or deemed unvalid as evidence. This paper gives an overview of some of the princi-pal and unexpected challenges that SSDs have brought with them for Digital Fo-rensics investigations. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Digital Forensic, Solid State Disk, Investigatory Guidelines.
in
Information Systems: a crossroads for Organization, Management, Accounting and Engineering
editor
D'Atri, Alessandro; Te'eni, Dov; De Marco, Marco; ; and
pages
8 pages
publisher
ItAIS
conference name
ItAIS 2011, Proceedings of the 8th Conference of the Italian Chapter of the Association for Information Systems
ISBN
978-88-6105-063-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c7010748-2e3a-439e-8107-07576b317d0f (old id 4318023)
alternative location
http://www.cersi.it/itais2011/pdf/30.pdf
date added to LUP
2014-02-24 10:25:37
date last changed
2016-04-16 07:26:07
@inproceedings{c7010748-2e3a-439e-8107-07576b317d0f,
  abstract     = {ICT changes continuously and we are used to look at IT in a slightly dif-ferent way every year. Things are developed and manufactured to be smaller and faster but few changes are truly technologically revolutionary. Some changes creep up on us as they arrive under cover of previously known technology. Solid State Disks (SSD) is such a technology. The use of SSD is simple enough and for many purposes it can be used as if it was a normal hard disc but many times faster and with a very much lower power consumption. But, SSD is not an evolution of hard disc technology, it is a completely new technology which imitates the behav-iour of a hard disc. There are major underpinning differences which have serious consequences for security and for digital forensic. Due to how the SSDs work it is not always certain that deleted data are purged from the disc. On the other hand SSD‟s can sometimes purge data all by themselves even if they are not connected to any interface with only the power on. This means that normal guidelines aimed at hard discs for how to preserve digital forensic evidence are not just inappropri-ate but could if followed result in potential evidence being lost, destroyed or deemed unvalid as evidence. This paper gives an overview of some of the princi-pal and unexpected challenges that SSDs have brought with them for Digital Fo-rensics investigations.},
  author       = {Bednar, Peter and Katos, Vasilis},
  booktitle    = {Information Systems: a crossroads for Organization, Management, Accounting and Engineering},
  editor       = {D'Atri, Alessandro and Te'eni, Dov and De Marco, Marco},
  isbn         = {978-88-6105-063-1},
  keyword      = {Digital Forensic,Solid State Disk,Investigatory Guidelines.},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {8},
  publisher    = {ItAIS},
  title        = {SSD: New Challenges for Digital Forensics},
  year         = {2011},
}