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Alcohol use and early mortality in Swedish middle-aged women: Nine-year follow-up of the Women's Health in Lund Area study.

Rundberg, Jenny LU ; Nilsson, Peter LU ; Samsioe, Göran LU and Öjehagen, Agneta LU (2014) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 42(4). p.344-348
Abstract
The majority of prospective studies on alcohol use and mortality risk indicate that non-drinkers are at increased risk of death compared to moderate drinkers. This article investigates the association between middle-aged women's alcohol use and mortality, controlling for socio-demographic and health variables. An association between alcohol use and hospital in-patient care is also analysed. Methods: Baseline data were collected during 1995-2000 in a population-based cohort of 6917 women aged 50-59 years living in southern Sweden, the Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA). After 9 years, a register follow-up was performed from the National cause-of-death register and the Swedish hospital discharge register. Cox proportional hazards regression... (More)
The majority of prospective studies on alcohol use and mortality risk indicate that non-drinkers are at increased risk of death compared to moderate drinkers. This article investigates the association between middle-aged women's alcohol use and mortality, controlling for socio-demographic and health variables. An association between alcohol use and hospital in-patient care is also analysed. Methods: Baseline data were collected during 1995-2000 in a population-based cohort of 6917 women aged 50-59 years living in southern Sweden, the Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA). After 9 years, a register follow-up was performed from the National cause-of-death register and the Swedish hospital discharge register. Cox proportional hazards regression were used to analyse differences in survival. Results: During the observation period, 201 (2.9%) women died. In a crude model, non-drinkers had a significantly increased risk for death. When including socio-demographic predictors in the model, there was a strong indication that non-drinkers were at increased risk for death compared to moderate drinkers. Adding health predictors, not drinking alcohol was no longer a risk factor for death. Further, analyses of in-patient care indicate that non-drinkers had poorer health during their entire adult life. Conclusions: This study underlines the importance of including health status at base-line when prospectively studying the association between alcohol use and mortality, otherwise moderate alcohol consumption may appear more beneficial than is the case. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
volume
42
issue
4
pages
344 - 348
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:24553481
  • wos:000336795300002
  • scopus:84901275808
ISSN
1651-1905
DOI
10.1177/1403494814523343
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
04e5e9fd-4a71-404b-9ffb-f663af622bdb (old id 4334386)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24553481?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-03-05 21:10:26
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:58:24
@article{04e5e9fd-4a71-404b-9ffb-f663af622bdb,
  abstract     = {The majority of prospective studies on alcohol use and mortality risk indicate that non-drinkers are at increased risk of death compared to moderate drinkers. This article investigates the association between middle-aged women's alcohol use and mortality, controlling for socio-demographic and health variables. An association between alcohol use and hospital in-patient care is also analysed. Methods: Baseline data were collected during 1995-2000 in a population-based cohort of 6917 women aged 50-59 years living in southern Sweden, the Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA). After 9 years, a register follow-up was performed from the National cause-of-death register and the Swedish hospital discharge register. Cox proportional hazards regression were used to analyse differences in survival. Results: During the observation period, 201 (2.9%) women died. In a crude model, non-drinkers had a significantly increased risk for death. When including socio-demographic predictors in the model, there was a strong indication that non-drinkers were at increased risk for death compared to moderate drinkers. Adding health predictors, not drinking alcohol was no longer a risk factor for death. Further, analyses of in-patient care indicate that non-drinkers had poorer health during their entire adult life. Conclusions: This study underlines the importance of including health status at base-line when prospectively studying the association between alcohol use and mortality, otherwise moderate alcohol consumption may appear more beneficial than is the case.},
  author       = {Rundberg, Jenny and Nilsson, Peter and Samsioe, Göran and Öjehagen, Agneta},
  issn         = {1651-1905},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {344--348},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Alcohol use and early mortality in Swedish middle-aged women: Nine-year follow-up of the Women's Health in Lund Area study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1403494814523343},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2014},
}