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Does biological quality matter? Direct and reflected appraisal of biodiversity in temperate deciduous broad-leaf forest.

Johansson, Maria LU ; Gyllin, Mats; Witzell, Jesper and Küller, Marianne LU (2014) In Urban Forestry & Urban Greening 13(1). p.28-37
Abstract (Swedish)
Using a multilevel approach, this study investigates direct (perceptual, emotional, and physiological responses [qEEG]) and reflected (preference, attitude, and intention to accept conservation measures) appraisal of different levels of biodiversity in temperate deciduous broad-leaf forest biotopes. Thirty-five participants viewed three series of zoomed pictures from biotopes assessed according to biological criteria to be of High, Intermediate, and Low level of biodiversity. Participants’ appraisal differed between the biotopes, and partly between the conceptualisation of appraisal, but overall there was a consistency across direct and reflected levels of appraisal. The most prominent result of the analysis of qEEG was a higher brain... (More)
Using a multilevel approach, this study investigates direct (perceptual, emotional, and physiological responses [qEEG]) and reflected (preference, attitude, and intention to accept conservation measures) appraisal of different levels of biodiversity in temperate deciduous broad-leaf forest biotopes. Thirty-five participants viewed three series of zoomed pictures from biotopes assessed according to biological criteria to be of High, Intermediate, and Low level of biodiversity. Participants’ appraisal differed between the biotopes, and partly between the conceptualisation of appraisal, but overall there was a consistency across direct and reflected levels of appraisal. The most prominent result of the analysis of qEEG was a higher brain activity in the Theta frequency for the Low biotope. The Theta frequency has amongst others been associated with on-set of sleep and in the present context probably indicating that the Low biotope was less stimulating. The Low biotope was perceived to have the lowest degree of biodiversity followed by the Intermediate and the High biotopes. The Intermediate biotope elicited the most positive emotional response, and was rated highest in preference and in importance to conserve, whereas the intention to accept conservation measures did not differ between the biotopes. Thus biodiversity related criteria presently favoured in forest conservation management schemes are not necessarily prioritised by the public. Emotional components are likely to be at stake tending to favour the conservation of biotopes of an intermediate level of biodiversity. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Attitude, Biodiversity, Deciduous forest, Perception, Preference, qEEG
in
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening
volume
13
issue
1
pages
28 - 37
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000335543800003
  • scopus:84895760911
ISSN
1618-8667
DOI
10.1016/j.ufug.2013.10.009
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bce5c9d3-c7ca-4ead-b18d-985270f5566c (old id 4358616)
date added to LUP
2014-03-13 09:49:44
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:02:27
@article{bce5c9d3-c7ca-4ead-b18d-985270f5566c,
  abstract     = {Using a multilevel approach, this study investigates direct (perceptual, emotional, and physiological responses [qEEG]) and reflected (preference, attitude, and intention to accept conservation measures) appraisal of different levels of biodiversity in temperate deciduous broad-leaf forest biotopes. Thirty-five participants viewed three series of zoomed pictures from biotopes assessed according to biological criteria to be of High, Intermediate, and Low level of biodiversity. Participants’ appraisal differed between the biotopes, and partly between the conceptualisation of appraisal, but overall there was a consistency across direct and reflected levels of appraisal. The most prominent result of the analysis of qEEG was a higher brain activity in the Theta frequency for the Low biotope. The Theta frequency has amongst others been associated with on-set of sleep and in the present context probably indicating that the Low biotope was less stimulating. The Low biotope was perceived to have the lowest degree of biodiversity followed by the Intermediate and the High biotopes. The Intermediate biotope elicited the most positive emotional response, and was rated highest in preference and in importance to conserve, whereas the intention to accept conservation measures did not differ between the biotopes. Thus biodiversity related criteria presently favoured in forest conservation management schemes are not necessarily prioritised by the public. Emotional components are likely to be at stake tending to favour the conservation of biotopes of an intermediate level of biodiversity.},
  author       = {Johansson, Maria and Gyllin, Mats and Witzell, Jesper and Küller, Marianne},
  issn         = {1618-8667},
  keyword      = {Attitude,Biodiversity,Deciduous forest,Perception,Preference,qEEG},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {28--37},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Urban Forestry & Urban Greening},
  title        = {Does biological quality matter? Direct and reflected appraisal of biodiversity in temperate deciduous broad-leaf forest.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ufug.2013.10.009},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2014},
}