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The Law of the Limit to Land Productivity and China’s

Pei, Xiaolin LU (2014) In Rural China 11(1). p.46-87
Abstract
Using a new concept—the law of the limit to land productivity—this article builds a three

(physical, economic, and institutional) worlds’ land-use model with inverse logics of different

development stages in a time perspective: before, in, and after the population trap. This model

extends the span of the Malthusian population model to history after the Industrial Revolution

and makes static property rights theory dynamic. It argues that 1) cost/return ratios decide the

effects of land rights; 2) changes in cost/return ratios alter the effects of land rights; and 3) changes

in land/labor ratios first alter cost/return ratios and then patterns of land rights. Using this

model and... (More)
Using a new concept—the law of the limit to land productivity—this article builds a three

(physical, economic, and institutional) worlds’ land-use model with inverse logics of different

development stages in a time perspective: before, in, and after the population trap. This model

extends the span of the Malthusian population model to history after the Industrial Revolution

and makes static property rights theory dynamic. It argues that 1) cost/return ratios decide the

effects of land rights; 2) changes in cost/return ratios alter the effects of land rights; and 3) changes

in land/labor ratios first alter cost/return ratios and then patterns of land rights. Using this

model and statistical data, the article, from the supply side, explores the validity of the concept

of China’s “hidden agricultural revolution” advanced by Philip C. C. Huang, and simultaneously

tests the model’s inverse logics and dynamic land rights theory. The result is that Douglass North’s

property rights theory has reversed the causality of things: although the state can set the property

regime, it cannot control what kind of effects will flow from the regime it chooses. Hence the state

should select property regimes according to their real effects rather than the effects subjectively

derived from North’s “theory.” (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
law of the limit to land productivity, Malthusian population model, static property rights theory, dynamic land rights theory, China’s “hidden agricultural revolution”
in
Rural China
volume
11
issue
1
pages
46 - 87
publisher
Brill Academic Publishers
ISSN
2213-6738
DOI
10.1163/22136746-12341249
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bd0f8d2d-ff30-4781-ab19-5ac9f3a3eba5 (old id 4362707)
date added to LUP
2014-03-26 12:37:15
date last changed
2016-04-16 01:18:23
@article{bd0f8d2d-ff30-4781-ab19-5ac9f3a3eba5,
  abstract     = {Using a new concept—the law of the limit to land productivity—this article builds a three<br/><br>
(physical, economic, and institutional) worlds’ land-use model with inverse logics of different<br/><br>
development stages in a time perspective: before, in, and after the population trap. This model<br/><br>
extends the span of the Malthusian population model to history after the Industrial Revolution<br/><br>
and makes static property rights theory dynamic. It argues that 1) cost/return ratios decide the<br/><br>
effects of land rights; 2) changes in cost/return ratios alter the effects of land rights; and 3) changes<br/><br>
in land/labor ratios first alter cost/return ratios and then patterns of land rights. Using this<br/><br>
model and statistical data, the article, from the supply side, explores the validity of the concept<br/><br>
of China’s “hidden agricultural revolution” advanced by Philip C. C. Huang, and simultaneously<br/><br>
tests the model’s inverse logics and dynamic land rights theory. The result is that Douglass North’s<br/><br>
property rights theory has reversed the causality of things: although the state can set the property<br/><br>
regime, it cannot control what kind of effects will flow from the regime it chooses. Hence the state<br/><br>
should select property regimes according to their real effects rather than the effects subjectively<br/><br>
derived from North’s “theory.”},
  author       = {Pei, Xiaolin},
  issn         = {2213-6738},
  keyword      = {law of the limit to land productivity,Malthusian population model,static property rights theory,dynamic land rights theory,China’s “hidden agricultural revolution”},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {46--87},
  publisher    = {Brill Academic Publishers},
  series       = {Rural China},
  title        = {The Law of the Limit to Land Productivity and China’s},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/22136746-12341249},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2014},
}