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Effect of multiplicity, laterality, and age at onset of breast cancer on familial risk of breast cancer: a nationwide prospective cohort study

Kharazmi, Elham; Chen, Tianhui; Narod, Steven; Sundquist, Kristina LU and Hemminki, Kari LU (2014) In Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 144(1). p.185-192
Abstract
The objective of this nationwide prospective cohort study is to find out the risk of breast cancer (BC) in relatives of patients with multiple BCs by laterality and age at diagnosis of first BC. Having family history of single (HR 1.8; 95 % CI 1.8-1.9) or multiple (HR 2.7; 95 % CI 2.6-2.9) BC was associated with higher risk of BC. Those with an FDR with contralateral BC at any age had the highest risk of familial cancer except at age < 40 in which those whose young FDR was affected by multiple ipsilateral BC had the highest risk (HR 9.7; 95 % CI 6.0-15.6). The familial risk of BC in these families decreased as the subject's and FDRs' age at diagnosis of first BC increased. The HR was still significantly increased (2.2) for old... (More)
The objective of this nationwide prospective cohort study is to find out the risk of breast cancer (BC) in relatives of patients with multiple BCs by laterality and age at diagnosis of first BC. Having family history of single (HR 1.8; 95 % CI 1.8-1.9) or multiple (HR 2.7; 95 % CI 2.6-2.9) BC was associated with higher risk of BC. Those with an FDR with contralateral BC at any age had the highest risk of familial cancer except at age < 40 in which those whose young FDR was affected by multiple ipsilateral BC had the highest risk (HR 9.7; 95 % CI 6.0-15.6). The familial risk of BC in these families decreased as the subject's and FDRs' age at diagnosis of first BC increased. The HR was still significantly increased (2.2) for old individuals (> 60) having a FDR with contralateral BC at an advanced age (a parts per thousand yen80). Despite the common belief that later onset breast cancer is more associated with sporadic breast cancer, our data suggest that breast cancer at any age in the family is associated with some increase in the familial risk, though that risk decreases as the age of onset increases. Contralateral and multiple ipsilateral breast cancers might be associated with distinct shared familial risk factors. Our results have implication for genetic counseling and urge gene identification studies. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Familial breast cancer, Contralateral breast cancer, Multiple, ipsilateral breast cancers, Age at onset
in
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
volume
144
issue
1
pages
185 - 192
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000331649300019
  • scopus:84894652217
ISSN
1573-7217
DOI
10.1007/s10549-014-2848-3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
46f60017-79a2-4fd0-b90d-340f4795e354 (old id 4364163)
date added to LUP
2014-04-07 09:24:12
date last changed
2017-08-13 03:56:06
@article{46f60017-79a2-4fd0-b90d-340f4795e354,
  abstract     = {The objective of this nationwide prospective cohort study is to find out the risk of breast cancer (BC) in relatives of patients with multiple BCs by laterality and age at diagnosis of first BC. Having family history of single (HR 1.8; 95 % CI 1.8-1.9) or multiple (HR 2.7; 95 % CI 2.6-2.9) BC was associated with higher risk of BC. Those with an FDR with contralateral BC at any age had the highest risk of familial cancer except at age &lt; 40 in which those whose young FDR was affected by multiple ipsilateral BC had the highest risk (HR 9.7; 95 % CI 6.0-15.6). The familial risk of BC in these families decreased as the subject's and FDRs' age at diagnosis of first BC increased. The HR was still significantly increased (2.2) for old individuals (&gt; 60) having a FDR with contralateral BC at an advanced age (a parts per thousand yen80). Despite the common belief that later onset breast cancer is more associated with sporadic breast cancer, our data suggest that breast cancer at any age in the family is associated with some increase in the familial risk, though that risk decreases as the age of onset increases. Contralateral and multiple ipsilateral breast cancers might be associated with distinct shared familial risk factors. Our results have implication for genetic counseling and urge gene identification studies.},
  author       = {Kharazmi, Elham and Chen, Tianhui and Narod, Steven and Sundquist, Kristina and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {1573-7217},
  keyword      = {Familial breast cancer,Contralateral breast cancer,Multiple,ipsilateral breast cancers,Age at onset},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {185--192},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Breast Cancer Research and Treatment},
  title        = {Effect of multiplicity, laterality, and age at onset of breast cancer on familial risk of breast cancer: a nationwide prospective cohort study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10549-014-2848-3},
  volume       = {144},
  year         = {2014},
}