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Physical activity may compensate for prolonged TV time regarding pulse rate—a cross-sectional study

Beijer, Kristina; Lampa, Erik; Sundström, Johan; Nilsson, Peter M. LU ; Elmståhl, Sölve LU ; Pedersen, Nancy L. and Lind, Lars (2018) In Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences 123(4). p.247-254
Abstract

Background. Regular exercise reduces pulse rate, but it is less clear how prolonged sitting time affects pulse rate. Our hypothesis was that high physical activity could compensate for prolonged sitting time regarding the pulse rate. Methods. Regression analysis was performed on cross-sectional data including 47,457 men and women based on two Swedish cohort studies, EpiHealth (18–45 years) and LifeGene (45–75 years). Self-reported leisure time physical activity was given in five levels, from low (level 1) to vigorous (level 5), and television time was used as a proxy of sitting time. Results. A higher physical activity (level 4 compared to level 1) was associated with a lower pulse rate in middle-aged females (-2.7 beats per minute... (More)

Background. Regular exercise reduces pulse rate, but it is less clear how prolonged sitting time affects pulse rate. Our hypothesis was that high physical activity could compensate for prolonged sitting time regarding the pulse rate. Methods. Regression analysis was performed on cross-sectional data including 47,457 men and women based on two Swedish cohort studies, EpiHealth (18–45 years) and LifeGene (45–75 years). Self-reported leisure time physical activity was given in five levels, from low (level 1) to vigorous (level 5), and television time was used as a proxy of sitting time. Results. A higher physical activity (level 4 compared to level 1) was associated with a lower pulse rate in middle-aged females (-2.7 beats per minute [bpm]; 95% CI -3.3 to -2.2) and males (-4.0 bpm; 95% CI -4.7 to -3.4). The relationship between physical activity and pulse rate was strongest in the young. A prolonged television time (3 h compared to 1 h per day) was associated with a slightly higher pulse rate in middle-aged females (+0.6 bpm; 95% CI +0.3 to +0.8) and males (+0.9 bpm; 95% CI +0.7 to +1.2). Among participants with a prolonged television time (3 h), those with a high physical activity (level 4) had a lower pulse rate compared to those with a low physical activity (level 1). Conclusions. A prolonged television time was associated with a high pulse rate, while high physical activity was associated with a low pulse rate. The results suggest that a high physical activity could compensate for a prolonged television time regarding pulse rate.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cross-sectional study, epidemiology, exercise, pulse rate, sitting time, television
in
Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences
volume
123
issue
4
pages
247 - 254
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85057298687
ISSN
0300-9734
DOI
10.1080/03009734.2018.1540505
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4386b5e8-8460-4cf1-b5be-0de43be8ce95
date added to LUP
2018-12-05 14:21:39
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:39:09
@article{4386b5e8-8460-4cf1-b5be-0de43be8ce95,
  abstract     = {<p>Background. Regular exercise reduces pulse rate, but it is less clear how prolonged sitting time affects pulse rate. Our hypothesis was that high physical activity could compensate for prolonged sitting time regarding the pulse rate. Methods. Regression analysis was performed on cross-sectional data including 47,457 men and women based on two Swedish cohort studies, EpiHealth (18–45 years) and LifeGene (45–75 years). Self-reported leisure time physical activity was given in five levels, from low (level 1) to vigorous (level 5), and television time was used as a proxy of sitting time. Results. A higher physical activity (level 4 compared to level 1) was associated with a lower pulse rate in middle-aged females (-2.7 beats per minute [bpm]; 95% CI -3.3 to -2.2) and males (-4.0 bpm; 95% CI -4.7 to -3.4). The relationship between physical activity and pulse rate was strongest in the young. A prolonged television time (3 h compared to 1 h per day) was associated with a slightly higher pulse rate in middle-aged females (+0.6 bpm; 95% CI +0.3 to +0.8) and males (+0.9 bpm; 95% CI +0.7 to +1.2). Among participants with a prolonged television time (3 h), those with a high physical activity (level 4) had a lower pulse rate compared to those with a low physical activity (level 1). Conclusions. A prolonged television time was associated with a high pulse rate, while high physical activity was associated with a low pulse rate. The results suggest that a high physical activity could compensate for a prolonged television time regarding pulse rate.</p>},
  author       = {Beijer, Kristina and Lampa, Erik and Sundström, Johan and Nilsson, Peter M. and Elmståhl, Sölve and Pedersen, Nancy L. and Lind, Lars},
  issn         = {0300-9734},
  keyword      = {Cross-sectional study,epidemiology,exercise,pulse rate,sitting time,television},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {247--254},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences},
  title        = {Physical activity may compensate for prolonged TV time regarding pulse rate—a cross-sectional study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03009734.2018.1540505},
  volume       = {123},
  year         = {2018},
}