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The impact of socio-economic status on net fertility during the historical fertility decline: A comparative analysis of Canada, Iceland, Sweden, Norway, and the USA.

Dribe, Martin LU ; Hacker, J David and Scalone, Francesco (2014) In Population Studies 68(2). p.135-149
Abstract
We used micro-level data from the censuses of 1900 to investigate the impact of socio-economic status on net fertility during the fertility transition in five Northern American and European countries (Canada, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and the USA). The study is therefore unlike most previous research on the historical fertility transition, which used aggregate data to examine economic correlates of demographic behaviour at regional or national levels. Our data included information on number of children by age, occupation of the mother and father, place of residence, and household context. The results show highly similar patterns across countries, with the elite and upper middle classes having considerably lower net fertility early in the... (More)
We used micro-level data from the censuses of 1900 to investigate the impact of socio-economic status on net fertility during the fertility transition in five Northern American and European countries (Canada, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and the USA). The study is therefore unlike most previous research on the historical fertility transition, which used aggregate data to examine economic correlates of demographic behaviour at regional or national levels. Our data included information on number of children by age, occupation of the mother and father, place of residence, and household context. The results show highly similar patterns across countries, with the elite and upper middle classes having considerably lower net fertility early in the transition. These patterns remain after controlling for a range of individual and community-level fertility determinants and geographical unobserved heterogeneity. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
fertility, socio-economic status, child-woman ratios, net fertility, fertility transition, innovation, adjustment
in
Population Studies
volume
68
issue
2
pages
135 - 149
publisher
Routledge
external identifiers
  • pmid:24684711
  • wos:000337088100001
  • scopus:84901418929
ISSN
1477-4747
DOI
10.1080/00324728.2014.889741
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
117b33c5-d9dc-4dcd-a25b-87fda436706f (old id 4431439)
date added to LUP
2014-07-17 10:02:28
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:02:21
@article{117b33c5-d9dc-4dcd-a25b-87fda436706f,
  abstract     = {We used micro-level data from the censuses of 1900 to investigate the impact of socio-economic status on net fertility during the fertility transition in five Northern American and European countries (Canada, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and the USA). The study is therefore unlike most previous research on the historical fertility transition, which used aggregate data to examine economic correlates of demographic behaviour at regional or national levels. Our data included information on number of children by age, occupation of the mother and father, place of residence, and household context. The results show highly similar patterns across countries, with the elite and upper middle classes having considerably lower net fertility early in the transition. These patterns remain after controlling for a range of individual and community-level fertility determinants and geographical unobserved heterogeneity.},
  author       = {Dribe, Martin and Hacker, J David and Scalone, Francesco},
  issn         = {1477-4747},
  keyword      = {fertility,socio-economic status,child-woman ratios,net fertility,fertility transition,innovation,adjustment},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {135--149},
  publisher    = {Routledge},
  series       = {Population Studies},
  title        = {The impact of socio-economic status on net fertility during the historical fertility decline: A comparative analysis of Canada, Iceland, Sweden, Norway, and the USA.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00324728.2014.889741},
  volume       = {68},
  year         = {2014},
}