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Temporal trends of sex disparity in incidence and survival of colorectal cancer : Variations by anatomical site and age at diagnosis

Sun, Ming LU ; Wang, Youxin ; Sundquist, Jan LU ; Sundquist, Kristina LU and Ji, Jianguang LU (2020) In Clinical Epidemiology 12. p.73-81
Abstract

Purpose: The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) varies by age, sex, and anatomical subsite. Few studies have examined the temporal trends of age-specific sex disparity in incidence and survival by age at diagnosis and anatomical site. Patients and Methods: The study was performed on all incident cases of CRC, using data derived from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Register between 1960 and 2014, including right-sided colon cancer (RCC), left-sided colon cancer (LCC), and rectal cancer. Male-to-female age-standardized incidence rate ratio (IRR) and male-to-female five-year survival rate ratio (SRR) were calculated as the main indicators. Furthermore, we performed joinpoint regression analyses to estimate average annual percentage change.... (More)

Purpose: The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) varies by age, sex, and anatomical subsite. Few studies have examined the temporal trends of age-specific sex disparity in incidence and survival by age at diagnosis and anatomical site. Patients and Methods: The study was performed on all incident cases of CRC, using data derived from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Register between 1960 and 2014, including right-sided colon cancer (RCC), left-sided colon cancer (LCC), and rectal cancer. Male-to-female age-standardized incidence rate ratio (IRR) and male-to-female five-year survival rate ratio (SRR) were calculated as the main indicators. Furthermore, we performed joinpoint regression analyses to estimate average annual percentage change. Results: The overall male-to-female IRR was 1.05 for RCC, 1.31 for LCC, and 1.66 for rectal cancer. Male-to-female IRR increased steadily for RCC by an average of 0.4% per year until the mid-1990s and then decreased gradually by an average of 1.0% per year. LCC patients showed an increase of 0.6% per year since the mid-1970s. For rectal cancer, a non-significant random fluctuation was noted during the study period. The temporal trends of male-to-female IRR varied by age at diagnosis. The male-to-female SRR was 0.87 for RCC, 0.88 for LCC, and 0.86 for rectal cancer, which remained relatively stable during the study period. Conclusion: Sex disparity of CRC is age-, period-, and anatomical subsite-dependent. Further studies are needed to investigate the underlying contributing factors.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Colorectal cancer, Incidence, Sex disparity, Survival, Temporal trend
in
Clinical Epidemiology
volume
12
pages
73 - 81
publisher
Dove Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:85078813175
  • pmid:32021473
ISSN
1179-1349
DOI
10.2147/CLEP.S240006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
44a6749a-e58a-4eb2-9c2f-e3ee815b4a14
date added to LUP
2020-02-14 15:39:15
date last changed
2020-02-15 03:00:03
@article{44a6749a-e58a-4eb2-9c2f-e3ee815b4a14,
  abstract     = {<p>Purpose: The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) varies by age, sex, and anatomical subsite. Few studies have examined the temporal trends of age-specific sex disparity in incidence and survival by age at diagnosis and anatomical site. Patients and Methods: The study was performed on all incident cases of CRC, using data derived from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Register between 1960 and 2014, including right-sided colon cancer (RCC), left-sided colon cancer (LCC), and rectal cancer. Male-to-female age-standardized incidence rate ratio (IRR) and male-to-female five-year survival rate ratio (SRR) were calculated as the main indicators. Furthermore, we performed joinpoint regression analyses to estimate average annual percentage change. Results: The overall male-to-female IRR was 1.05 for RCC, 1.31 for LCC, and 1.66 for rectal cancer. Male-to-female IRR increased steadily for RCC by an average of 0.4% per year until the mid-1990s and then decreased gradually by an average of 1.0% per year. LCC patients showed an increase of 0.6% per year since the mid-1970s. For rectal cancer, a non-significant random fluctuation was noted during the study period. The temporal trends of male-to-female IRR varied by age at diagnosis. The male-to-female SRR was 0.87 for RCC, 0.88 for LCC, and 0.86 for rectal cancer, which remained relatively stable during the study period. Conclusion: Sex disparity of CRC is age-, period-, and anatomical subsite-dependent. Further studies are needed to investigate the underlying contributing factors.</p>},
  author       = {Sun, Ming and Wang, Youxin and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina and Ji, Jianguang},
  issn         = {1179-1349},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {73--81},
  publisher    = {Dove Press},
  series       = {Clinical Epidemiology},
  title        = {Temporal trends of sex disparity in incidence and survival of colorectal cancer : Variations by anatomical site and age at diagnosis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CLEP.S240006},
  doi          = {10.2147/CLEP.S240006},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2020},
}