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Focusing of sub-micrometer particles and bacteria enabled by two-dimensional acoustophoresis.

Antfolk, Maria LU ; Muller, P B; Augustsson, Per LU ; Bruus, H and Laurell, Thomas LU (2014) In Lab on A Chip 14(15). p.2791-2799
Abstract
Handling of sub-micrometer bioparticles such as bacteria are becoming increasingly important in the biomedical field and in environmental and food analysis. As a result, there is an increased need for less labor-intensive and time-consuming handling methods. Here, an acoustophoresis-based microfluidic chip that uses ultrasound to focus sub-micrometer particles and bacteria, is presented. The ability to focus sub-micrometer bioparticles in a standing one-dimensional acoustic wave is generally limited by the acoustic-streaming-induced drag force, which becomes increasingly significant the smaller the particles are. By using two-dimensional acoustic focusing, i.e. focusing of the sub-micrometer particles both horizontally and vertically in... (More)
Handling of sub-micrometer bioparticles such as bacteria are becoming increasingly important in the biomedical field and in environmental and food analysis. As a result, there is an increased need for less labor-intensive and time-consuming handling methods. Here, an acoustophoresis-based microfluidic chip that uses ultrasound to focus sub-micrometer particles and bacteria, is presented. The ability to focus sub-micrometer bioparticles in a standing one-dimensional acoustic wave is generally limited by the acoustic-streaming-induced drag force, which becomes increasingly significant the smaller the particles are. By using two-dimensional acoustic focusing, i.e. focusing of the sub-micrometer particles both horizontally and vertically in the cross section of a microchannel, the acoustic streaming velocity field can be altered to allow focusing. Here, the focusability of E. coli and polystyrene particles as small as 0.5 μm in diameter in microchannels of square or rectangular cross sections, is demonstrated. Numerical analysis was used to determine generic transverse particle trajectories in the channels, which revealed spiral-shaped trajectories of the sub-micrometer particles towards the center of the microchannel; this was also confirmed by experimental observations. The ability to focus and enrich bacteria and other sub-micrometer bioparticles using acoustophoresis opens the research field to new microbiological applications. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Lab on A Chip
volume
14
issue
15
pages
2791 - 2799
publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry
external identifiers
  • pmid:24895052
  • wos:000339306700022
  • scopus:84903794574
ISSN
1473-0189
DOI
10.1039/c4lc00202d
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e303e369-2da0-4e0f-a43f-b9aa549a76d4 (old id 4529301)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24895052?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-07-04 14:13:19
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:03:47
@article{e303e369-2da0-4e0f-a43f-b9aa549a76d4,
  abstract     = {Handling of sub-micrometer bioparticles such as bacteria are becoming increasingly important in the biomedical field and in environmental and food analysis. As a result, there is an increased need for less labor-intensive and time-consuming handling methods. Here, an acoustophoresis-based microfluidic chip that uses ultrasound to focus sub-micrometer particles and bacteria, is presented. The ability to focus sub-micrometer bioparticles in a standing one-dimensional acoustic wave is generally limited by the acoustic-streaming-induced drag force, which becomes increasingly significant the smaller the particles are. By using two-dimensional acoustic focusing, i.e. focusing of the sub-micrometer particles both horizontally and vertically in the cross section of a microchannel, the acoustic streaming velocity field can be altered to allow focusing. Here, the focusability of E. coli and polystyrene particles as small as 0.5 μm in diameter in microchannels of square or rectangular cross sections, is demonstrated. Numerical analysis was used to determine generic transverse particle trajectories in the channels, which revealed spiral-shaped trajectories of the sub-micrometer particles towards the center of the microchannel; this was also confirmed by experimental observations. The ability to focus and enrich bacteria and other sub-micrometer bioparticles using acoustophoresis opens the research field to new microbiological applications.},
  author       = {Antfolk, Maria and Muller, P B and Augustsson, Per and Bruus, H and Laurell, Thomas},
  issn         = {1473-0189},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {15},
  pages        = {2791--2799},
  publisher    = {Royal Society of Chemistry},
  series       = {Lab on A Chip},
  title        = {Focusing of sub-micrometer particles and bacteria enabled by two-dimensional acoustophoresis.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c4lc00202d},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2014},
}