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Escalate shamefully, de-escalate angrily or gratefully: The influence of discrete emotions on escalation of commitment.

Dang, Junhua LU ; Xiao, Shanshan and Liljedahl, Sophie LU (2014) In Scandinavian Journal of Psychology 55(4). p.380-388
Abstract
Decision makers often tend to escalate their commitment when faced with a dilemma of whether to continue a losing course of action. Researchers recently began to investigate the influence of discrete emotions on this decision tendency. However, this work has mainly focused on negative emotions and rarely considered positive emotions, to say nothing of comparing the effects of both of them simultaneously. The current study addresses this need by presenting the results of three experiments that examined the effects of four emotions of both positive and negative valences in escalation situations. Experiment 1 investigated the relationships of three trait emotions (hope, shame, and anger) and escalation of commitment. Experiments 2 and 3... (More)
Decision makers often tend to escalate their commitment when faced with a dilemma of whether to continue a losing course of action. Researchers recently began to investigate the influence of discrete emotions on this decision tendency. However, this work has mainly focused on negative emotions and rarely considered positive emotions, to say nothing of comparing the effects of both of them simultaneously. The current study addresses this need by presenting the results of three experiments that examined the effects of four emotions of both positive and negative valences in escalation situations. Experiment 1 investigated the relationships of three trait emotions (hope, shame, and anger) and escalation of commitment. Experiments 2 and 3 examined the effects of three induced emotions (anger, shame, and gratitude) on escalation of commitment in a student sample and an employee sample, respectively. The results revealed that the effects of discrete emotions in escalation situations are mainly due to their associated differences on the appraisal dimension of responsibility that is related to escalation situations rather than their valence. The theoretical and practical implications are discussed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Psychology
volume
55
issue
4
pages
380 - 388
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:24888976
  • wos:000339617500013
  • scopus:84904114733
ISSN
1467-9450
DOI
10.1111/sjop.12128
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
345ed7cc-38d3-405b-a7f0-5437313779c6 (old id 4529373)
date added to LUP
2014-07-08 10:37:20
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:28:16
@article{345ed7cc-38d3-405b-a7f0-5437313779c6,
  abstract     = {Decision makers often tend to escalate their commitment when faced with a dilemma of whether to continue a losing course of action. Researchers recently began to investigate the influence of discrete emotions on this decision tendency. However, this work has mainly focused on negative emotions and rarely considered positive emotions, to say nothing of comparing the effects of both of them simultaneously. The current study addresses this need by presenting the results of three experiments that examined the effects of four emotions of both positive and negative valences in escalation situations. Experiment 1 investigated the relationships of three trait emotions (hope, shame, and anger) and escalation of commitment. Experiments 2 and 3 examined the effects of three induced emotions (anger, shame, and gratitude) on escalation of commitment in a student sample and an employee sample, respectively. The results revealed that the effects of discrete emotions in escalation situations are mainly due to their associated differences on the appraisal dimension of responsibility that is related to escalation situations rather than their valence. The theoretical and practical implications are discussed.},
  author       = {Dang, Junhua and Xiao, Shanshan and Liljedahl, Sophie},
  issn         = {1467-9450},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {380--388},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Psychology},
  title        = {Escalate shamefully, de-escalate angrily or gratefully: The influence of discrete emotions on escalation of commitment.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sjop.12128},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2014},
}