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Strategy for Standardization of Preeclampsia Research Study Design

Myatt, Leslie; Redman, Christopher W.; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Hansson, Stefan LU ; Wilson, Melissa L.; Laivuori, Hannele; Poston, Lucilla and Roberts, James M. (2014) In Hypertension 63(6). p.1293-1301
Abstract
Preeclampsia remains a major problem worldwide for mothers and babies. Despite intensive study, we have not been able to improve the management or early recognition of preeclampsia. At least part of this is because of failure to standardize the approach to studying this complex syndrome. It is possible that within the syndrome there may be different phenotypes with pathogenic pathways that differ between the subtypes. The capacity to recognize and to exploit different subtypes is of obvious importance for prediction, prevention, and treatment. We present a strategy for research to study preeclampsia, which will allow discrimination of such possible subtypes and also allow comparison and perhaps combinations of findings in different studies... (More)
Preeclampsia remains a major problem worldwide for mothers and babies. Despite intensive study, we have not been able to improve the management or early recognition of preeclampsia. At least part of this is because of failure to standardize the approach to studying this complex syndrome. It is possible that within the syndrome there may be different phenotypes with pathogenic pathways that differ between the subtypes. The capacity to recognize and to exploit different subtypes is of obvious importance for prediction, prevention, and treatment. We present a strategy for research to study preeclampsia, which will allow discrimination of such possible subtypes and also allow comparison and perhaps combinations of findings in different studies by standardized data and biosample collection. To make studies relevant to current clinical practice, the definition of preeclampsia can be that currently used and accepted. However, more importantly, sufficient data should be collected to allow other diagnostic criteria to be used and applied retrospectively. To that end, we present what we consider to be the minimum requirements for a data set in a study of preeclampsia that will facilitate comparisons. We also present a comprehensive or optimal data set for in-depth investigation of pathophysiology. As we approach the definition of phenotypes of preeclampsia by clinical and biochemical criteria, adherence to standardized protocols will hasten our understanding of the causes of preeclampsia and development of targeted treatment strategies. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
hypertension, placenta, pre-eclampsia, pregnancy, proteinuria
in
Hypertension
volume
63
issue
6
pages
1293 - 1301
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000335491900166
  • scopus:84902273313
ISSN
1524-4563
DOI
10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.113.02664
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e17a8829-bf93-4276-a6fd-abff2e946f63 (old id 4558988)
date added to LUP
2014-08-01 07:41:36
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:10:09
@article{e17a8829-bf93-4276-a6fd-abff2e946f63,
  abstract     = {Preeclampsia remains a major problem worldwide for mothers and babies. Despite intensive study, we have not been able to improve the management or early recognition of preeclampsia. At least part of this is because of failure to standardize the approach to studying this complex syndrome. It is possible that within the syndrome there may be different phenotypes with pathogenic pathways that differ between the subtypes. The capacity to recognize and to exploit different subtypes is of obvious importance for prediction, prevention, and treatment. We present a strategy for research to study preeclampsia, which will allow discrimination of such possible subtypes and also allow comparison and perhaps combinations of findings in different studies by standardized data and biosample collection. To make studies relevant to current clinical practice, the definition of preeclampsia can be that currently used and accepted. However, more importantly, sufficient data should be collected to allow other diagnostic criteria to be used and applied retrospectively. To that end, we present what we consider to be the minimum requirements for a data set in a study of preeclampsia that will facilitate comparisons. We also present a comprehensive or optimal data set for in-depth investigation of pathophysiology. As we approach the definition of phenotypes of preeclampsia by clinical and biochemical criteria, adherence to standardized protocols will hasten our understanding of the causes of preeclampsia and development of targeted treatment strategies.},
  author       = {Myatt, Leslie and Redman, Christopher W. and Staff, Anne Cathrine and Hansson, Stefan and Wilson, Melissa L. and Laivuori, Hannele and Poston, Lucilla and Roberts, James M.},
  issn         = {1524-4563},
  keyword      = {hypertension,placenta,pre-eclampsia,pregnancy,proteinuria},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1293--1301},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Hypertension},
  title        = {Strategy for Standardization of Preeclampsia Research Study Design},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.113.02664},
  volume       = {63},
  year         = {2014},
}