Advanced

Factors Influencing Occupational Engagement in Day Centers for People with Psychiatric Disabilities.

Tjörnstrand, Carina LU ; Bejerholm, Ulrika LU and Eklund, Mona LU (2015) In Community Mental Health Journal 51(1). p.48-53
Abstract
Occupational engagement is a vital factor in people's lives since it has been shown to be important for health and well-being. Community-based day centers (DCs), both meeting place-oriented and work-oriented ones, are common service alternatives in many western countries for enabling engagement in productive and leisure occupations among people with psychiatric disabilities. Little is, however, known about factors influencing occupational engagement in such settings. We aimed to investigate how factors pertaining to day center attendance, socio-demographics, motivation, clinical and self-related characteristics were related to how day center attendees rated their occupational engagement in productive occupations. These variables were... (More)
Occupational engagement is a vital factor in people's lives since it has been shown to be important for health and well-being. Community-based day centers (DCs), both meeting place-oriented and work-oriented ones, are common service alternatives in many western countries for enabling engagement in productive and leisure occupations among people with psychiatric disabilities. Little is, however, known about factors influencing occupational engagement in such settings. We aimed to investigate how factors pertaining to day center attendance, socio-demographics, motivation, clinical and self-related characteristics were related to how day center attendees rated their occupational engagement in productive occupations. These variables were assessed among day center attendees in meeting place-oriented (n = 39) and work-oriented (n = 54) DCs in Sweden through questionnaires and interviews. Logistic regression models showed that (1) less general psychopathology and more time spent on day center occupations were indicators of belonging to the group with a high level of occupational engagement according to a median cut; (2) higher perceived self-mastery was the only important factor with respect to ratings of occupational engagement above the third quartile. The models may be seen as creating a stepwise indication on which factors are important for reaching a medium level of occupational engagement (less severe general psychopathology and time spent at the day center) and for reaching a still higher level (a high level self-mastery), respectively, of occupational engagement. The findings may also be discussed in relation to different levels of engagement in a recovery process. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Community Mental Health Journal
volume
51
issue
1
pages
48 - 53
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:25062905
  • wos:000347724200006
  • scopus:84939878752
ISSN
0010-3853
DOI
10.1007/s10597-014-9765-0
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fddd6f6a-2716-46bd-8f75-b36e9fb1b879 (old id 4581254)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25062905?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-08-09 15:44:08
date last changed
2017-04-02 03:02:20
@article{fddd6f6a-2716-46bd-8f75-b36e9fb1b879,
  abstract     = {Occupational engagement is a vital factor in people's lives since it has been shown to be important for health and well-being. Community-based day centers (DCs), both meeting place-oriented and work-oriented ones, are common service alternatives in many western countries for enabling engagement in productive and leisure occupations among people with psychiatric disabilities. Little is, however, known about factors influencing occupational engagement in such settings. We aimed to investigate how factors pertaining to day center attendance, socio-demographics, motivation, clinical and self-related characteristics were related to how day center attendees rated their occupational engagement in productive occupations. These variables were assessed among day center attendees in meeting place-oriented (n = 39) and work-oriented (n = 54) DCs in Sweden through questionnaires and interviews. Logistic regression models showed that (1) less general psychopathology and more time spent on day center occupations were indicators of belonging to the group with a high level of occupational engagement according to a median cut; (2) higher perceived self-mastery was the only important factor with respect to ratings of occupational engagement above the third quartile. The models may be seen as creating a stepwise indication on which factors are important for reaching a medium level of occupational engagement (less severe general psychopathology and time spent at the day center) and for reaching a still higher level (a high level self-mastery), respectively, of occupational engagement. The findings may also be discussed in relation to different levels of engagement in a recovery process.},
  author       = {Tjörnstrand, Carina and Bejerholm, Ulrika and Eklund, Mona},
  issn         = {0010-3853},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {48--53},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Community Mental Health Journal},
  title        = {Factors Influencing Occupational Engagement in Day Centers for People with Psychiatric Disabilities.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10597-014-9765-0},
  volume       = {51},
  year         = {2015},
}