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How do episodic and semantic memory contribute to episodic foresight in young children?

Martin-Ordas, Gema LU ; Atance, Cristina M. and Caza, Julian S. (2014) In Frontiers in Psychology 5.
Abstract
Humans are able to transcend the present and mentally travel to another time, place, or perspective. Mentally projecting ourselves backwards (i.e., episodic memory) or forwards (i.e., episodic foresight) in time are crucial characteristics of the human memory system. Indeed, over the past few years, episodic memory has been argued to be involved both in our capacity to retrieve our personal past experiences and in our ability to imagine and foresee future scenarios. However, recent theory and findings suggest that semantic memory also plays a significant role in imagining future scenarios. We draw on Tulving's definition of episodic and semantic memory to provide a critical analysis of their role in episodic foresight tasks described in... (More)
Humans are able to transcend the present and mentally travel to another time, place, or perspective. Mentally projecting ourselves backwards (i.e., episodic memory) or forwards (i.e., episodic foresight) in time are crucial characteristics of the human memory system. Indeed, over the past few years, episodic memory has been argued to be involved both in our capacity to retrieve our personal past experiences and in our ability to imagine and foresee future scenarios. However, recent theory and findings suggest that semantic memory also plays a significant role in imagining future scenarios. We draw on Tulving's definition of episodic and semantic memory to provide a critical analysis of their role in episodic foresight tasks described in the developmental literature. We conclude by suggesting future directions of research that could further our understanding of how both episodic memory and semantic memory are intimately connected to episodic foresight. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
episodic memory, semantic memory, episodic foresight, children, developmental psychology
in
Frontiers in Psychology
volume
5
publisher
Frontiers
external identifiers
  • wos:000338948200001
  • pmid:25071690
  • scopus:84904760173
ISSN
1664-1078
DOI
10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00732
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
40f7a246-91ff-4c45-ad93-60edadabeda4 (old id 4598957)
date added to LUP
2014-09-03 09:58:43
date last changed
2017-02-12 03:46:53
@article{40f7a246-91ff-4c45-ad93-60edadabeda4,
  abstract     = {Humans are able to transcend the present and mentally travel to another time, place, or perspective. Mentally projecting ourselves backwards (i.e., episodic memory) or forwards (i.e., episodic foresight) in time are crucial characteristics of the human memory system. Indeed, over the past few years, episodic memory has been argued to be involved both in our capacity to retrieve our personal past experiences and in our ability to imagine and foresee future scenarios. However, recent theory and findings suggest that semantic memory also plays a significant role in imagining future scenarios. We draw on Tulving's definition of episodic and semantic memory to provide a critical analysis of their role in episodic foresight tasks described in the developmental literature. We conclude by suggesting future directions of research that could further our understanding of how both episodic memory and semantic memory are intimately connected to episodic foresight.},
  author       = {Martin-Ordas, Gema and Atance, Cristina M. and Caza, Julian S.},
  issn         = {1664-1078},
  keyword      = {episodic memory,semantic memory,episodic foresight,children,developmental psychology},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Frontiers},
  series       = {Frontiers in Psychology},
  title        = {How do episodic and semantic memory contribute to episodic foresight in young children?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00732},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2014},
}