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Correlation between sound insulation and occupants' perception - Proposal of alternative single number rating of impact sound

Ljunggren, Fredrik; Simmons, Christian and Hagberg, Klas LU (2014) In Applied Acoustics 85. p.57-68
Abstract
Traditionally, multi-family houses have been constructed using heavy, homogenous materials like concrete and masonry. But as a consequence of the progress of lightweight building systems during the last decades, it has been questioned whether standardized sound insulation evaluation methods still are appropriate. An extensive measurement template has been applied in a field survey where several vibrational and acoustical parameters were determined in ten Swedish buildings of various constructions. In the same buildings, the occupants were asked to rate the perceived annoyance from a variety of natural sound sources. The highest annoyance score concerned impact sounds, mainly in the buildings with lightweight floors. Statistical analyses... (More)
Traditionally, multi-family houses have been constructed using heavy, homogenous materials like concrete and masonry. But as a consequence of the progress of lightweight building systems during the last decades, it has been questioned whether standardized sound insulation evaluation methods still are appropriate. An extensive measurement template has been applied in a field survey where several vibrational and acoustical parameters were determined in ten Swedish buildings of various constructions. In the same buildings, the occupants were asked to rate the perceived annoyance from a variety of natural sound sources. The highest annoyance score concerned impact sounds, mainly in the buildings with lightweight floors. Statistical analyses between the measured parameters and the subjective ratings revealed a useful correlation between the rated airborne sound insulation and R'(w) + C50-3150 while the correlation between the rated impact sound insulation and L'(n,w) + C-1,C-50-2500 was weak. The latter correlation was considerably improved when the spectrum adaptation term with an extended frequency range starting from 20 Hz was applied. This suggests that frequencies below 50 Hz should be considered when evaluating impact sound in lightweight buildings. (c) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Impact sound insulation lightweight, building acoustic
in
Applied Acoustics
volume
85
pages
57 - 68
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000337877200006
  • scopus:84899857049
ISSN
0003-682X
DOI
10.1016/j.apacoust.2014.04.003
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4b5b7f8a-adf9-498c-9cc4-168a6de3c87f (old id 4608830)
date added to LUP
2014-09-04 10:30:28
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:00:49
@article{4b5b7f8a-adf9-498c-9cc4-168a6de3c87f,
  abstract     = {Traditionally, multi-family houses have been constructed using heavy, homogenous materials like concrete and masonry. But as a consequence of the progress of lightweight building systems during the last decades, it has been questioned whether standardized sound insulation evaluation methods still are appropriate. An extensive measurement template has been applied in a field survey where several vibrational and acoustical parameters were determined in ten Swedish buildings of various constructions. In the same buildings, the occupants were asked to rate the perceived annoyance from a variety of natural sound sources. The highest annoyance score concerned impact sounds, mainly in the buildings with lightweight floors. Statistical analyses between the measured parameters and the subjective ratings revealed a useful correlation between the rated airborne sound insulation and R'(w) + C50-3150 while the correlation between the rated impact sound insulation and L'(n,w) + C-1,C-50-2500 was weak. The latter correlation was considerably improved when the spectrum adaptation term with an extended frequency range starting from 20 Hz was applied. This suggests that frequencies below 50 Hz should be considered when evaluating impact sound in lightweight buildings. (c) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Ljunggren, Fredrik and Simmons, Christian and Hagberg, Klas},
  issn         = {0003-682X},
  keyword      = {Impact sound insulation lightweight,building acoustic},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {57--68},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Applied Acoustics},
  title        = {Correlation between sound insulation and occupants' perception - Proposal of alternative single number rating of impact sound},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apacoust.2014.04.003},
  volume       = {85},
  year         = {2014},
}