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When More Depletion Offsets the Ego Depletion Effect

Shanshan, Xiao; Dang, Junhua LU ; Mao, Lihua and Liljedahl, Sophie LU (2014) In Social Psychology 45(5). p.421-425
Abstract
The ego depletion effect has been consistently replicated using the typical paradigm that consists of two consecutive tasks. However, striking contradiction exists in studies employing multiple tasks. The aim of the current study is to replicate previous studies following a similar procedure and design in a sample of participants from a non-western cultural background (Chinese), while strictly controlling other confounding factors, such as task duration. Results indicated that although ego depletion occurred after performing a single initial self-control task, engaging in multiple tasks did indeed offset the depletion effect. These findings are contrary to the resource-based view of ego depletion (i.e., the strength model) but more... (More)
The ego depletion effect has been consistently replicated using the typical paradigm that consists of two consecutive tasks. However, striking contradiction exists in studies employing multiple tasks. The aim of the current study is to replicate previous studies following a similar procedure and design in a sample of participants from a non-western cultural background (Chinese), while strictly controlling other confounding factors, such as task duration. Results indicated that although ego depletion occurred after performing a single initial self-control task, engaging in multiple tasks did indeed offset the depletion effect. These findings are contrary to the resource-based view of ego depletion (i.e., the strength model) but more consistent with other theoretical frameworks, such as the cognitive control theory. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Social Psychology
volume
45
issue
5
pages
421 - 425
publisher
Hogrefe & Huber Publishers
external identifiers
  • wos:000344313200009
  • scopus:84907953573
ISSN
2151-2590
DOI
10.1027/1864-9335/a000197
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
46248b07-ab5c-4a05-950a-1d424609ff2c (old id 4611253)
date added to LUP
2014-08-27 13:19:26
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:11:07
@article{46248b07-ab5c-4a05-950a-1d424609ff2c,
  abstract     = {The ego depletion effect has been consistently replicated using the typical paradigm that consists of two consecutive tasks. However, striking contradiction exists in studies employing multiple tasks. The aim of the current study is to replicate previous studies following a similar procedure and design in a sample of participants from a non-western cultural background (Chinese), while strictly controlling other confounding factors, such as task duration. Results indicated that although ego depletion occurred after performing a single initial self-control task, engaging in multiple tasks did indeed offset the depletion effect. These findings are contrary to the resource-based view of ego depletion (i.e., the strength model) but more consistent with other theoretical frameworks, such as the cognitive control theory.},
  author       = {Shanshan, Xiao and Dang, Junhua and Mao, Lihua and Liljedahl, Sophie},
  issn         = {2151-2590},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {421--425},
  publisher    = {Hogrefe & Huber Publishers},
  series       = {Social Psychology},
  title        = {When More Depletion Offsets the Ego Depletion Effect},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1027/1864-9335/a000197},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2014},
}