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Immigrant health, our health.

Hemminki, Kari LU (2014) In European Journal of Public Health 24 Suppl 1. p.92-95
Abstract
This final chapter reviews the main conclusions reached by the Special Issue articles in the areas of EUNAM (EU and North African Migrants: Health and Health Systems) activities, covering well-being, health status, disease panorama and use of health services of immigrants to the EU. The reviewed chapters show that immigrants are a vulnerable population experiencing, in some aspects, discrimination and hardship similar to the socially weakest national population groups. Immigration has changed the disease spectrum, particularly in infectious diseases and recessive conditions such as sickle cell disease and familial Mediterranean fever. Importantly, health questions of immigrants cannot be separated from those of any human health issues. An... (More)
This final chapter reviews the main conclusions reached by the Special Issue articles in the areas of EUNAM (EU and North African Migrants: Health and Health Systems) activities, covering well-being, health status, disease panorama and use of health services of immigrants to the EU. The reviewed chapters show that immigrants are a vulnerable population experiencing, in some aspects, discrimination and hardship similar to the socially weakest national population groups. Immigration has changed the disease spectrum, particularly in infectious diseases and recessive conditions such as sickle cell disease and familial Mediterranean fever. Importantly, health questions of immigrants cannot be separated from those of any human health issues. An imminent new immigrant question for the EU will be the massive internal migration. Although the overall disease spectrum may not be vastly different between EU countries, the internal migrants will be exposed to lifestyle-dependent ill health and diseases probably in a similar way as did migrants from outside Europe. Migrant health research requires dedicated funding, which needs to come from central EU sources because multiple nationalities are involved. This funding should be able to project the course of health from the country of origin to the country of destination and back again, which was one of guidelines in the funding that initiated EUNAM. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Public Health
volume
24 Suppl 1
pages
92 - 95
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:25108004
  • scopus:84906273516
ISSN
1101-1262
DOI
10.1093/eurpub/cku108
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
54b4bc73-d9fa-4382-8fb6-013bfb871495 (old id 4615053)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25108004?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-09-05 23:19:29
date last changed
2017-10-29 04:30:28
@article{54b4bc73-d9fa-4382-8fb6-013bfb871495,
  abstract     = {This final chapter reviews the main conclusions reached by the Special Issue articles in the areas of EUNAM (EU and North African Migrants: Health and Health Systems) activities, covering well-being, health status, disease panorama and use of health services of immigrants to the EU. The reviewed chapters show that immigrants are a vulnerable population experiencing, in some aspects, discrimination and hardship similar to the socially weakest national population groups. Immigration has changed the disease spectrum, particularly in infectious diseases and recessive conditions such as sickle cell disease and familial Mediterranean fever. Importantly, health questions of immigrants cannot be separated from those of any human health issues. An imminent new immigrant question for the EU will be the massive internal migration. Although the overall disease spectrum may not be vastly different between EU countries, the internal migrants will be exposed to lifestyle-dependent ill health and diseases probably in a similar way as did migrants from outside Europe. Migrant health research requires dedicated funding, which needs to come from central EU sources because multiple nationalities are involved. This funding should be able to project the course of health from the country of origin to the country of destination and back again, which was one of guidelines in the funding that initiated EUNAM.},
  author       = {Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {1101-1262},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {92--95},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {European Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Immigrant health, our health.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/cku108},
  volume       = {24 Suppl 1},
  year         = {2014},
}