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Cancer in immigrants as a pointer to the causes of cancer.

Hemminki, Kari LU ; Försti, Asta LU ; Khyatti, Meriem; Anwar, Wagida A and Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen LU (2014) In European Journal of Public Health 24 Suppl 1. p.64-71
Abstract
The early cancer studies on immigrants, which started to appear some 50 years ago, showed that the incidence in cancers changes to the level of the new host country in one or two generations. These findings were fundamental to the understanding of the environmental etiology of human cancer. Many immigrant groups originate from countries with no cancer registration, and, hence, the immigrant studies may provide estimates on the indigenous cancer rates. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database has been an important source of data for immigrant studies on various diseases. The Database covers the Swedish population of the past 100 years, and it records the country of birth for each subject. A total of 1.79 million individuals were foreign born,... (More)
The early cancer studies on immigrants, which started to appear some 50 years ago, showed that the incidence in cancers changes to the level of the new host country in one or two generations. These findings were fundamental to the understanding of the environmental etiology of human cancer. Many immigrant groups originate from countries with no cancer registration, and, hence, the immigrant studies may provide estimates on the indigenous cancer rates. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database has been an important source of data for immigrant studies on various diseases. The Database covers the Swedish population of the past 100 years, and it records the country of birth for each subject. A total of 1.79 million individuals were foreign born, Finns and other Scandinavians being the largest immigrant groups. Over the course of years, some 30 publications have appeared relating to cancer in immigrants. In the present article, we will review more recent immigrant studies, mainly among Swedish immigrants, on all cancers and emphasize the differences between ethnic groups. In the second part, we discuss the problem of reliable registration of cancer and compare cancer incidence among non-European immigrants with cancer incidence in countries of origin, as these have now active cancer registries. We discuss the experiences in cancer registration in Morocco and Egypt. We show the usefulness and limitations in predicting cancer incidence in the countries of origin. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Public Health
volume
24 Suppl 1
pages
64 - 71
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:25108000
  • scopus:84906273698
ISSN
1101-1262
DOI
10.1093/eurpub/cku102
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4469521b-0188-412f-bb81-aa13e6537e40 (old id 4615075)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25108000?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-09-05 23:16:33
date last changed
2017-07-30 04:47:59
@article{4469521b-0188-412f-bb81-aa13e6537e40,
  abstract     = {The early cancer studies on immigrants, which started to appear some 50 years ago, showed that the incidence in cancers changes to the level of the new host country in one or two generations. These findings were fundamental to the understanding of the environmental etiology of human cancer. Many immigrant groups originate from countries with no cancer registration, and, hence, the immigrant studies may provide estimates on the indigenous cancer rates. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database has been an important source of data for immigrant studies on various diseases. The Database covers the Swedish population of the past 100 years, and it records the country of birth for each subject. A total of 1.79 million individuals were foreign born, Finns and other Scandinavians being the largest immigrant groups. Over the course of years, some 30 publications have appeared relating to cancer in immigrants. In the present article, we will review more recent immigrant studies, mainly among Swedish immigrants, on all cancers and emphasize the differences between ethnic groups. In the second part, we discuss the problem of reliable registration of cancer and compare cancer incidence among non-European immigrants with cancer incidence in countries of origin, as these have now active cancer registries. We discuss the experiences in cancer registration in Morocco and Egypt. We show the usefulness and limitations in predicting cancer incidence in the countries of origin.},
  author       = {Hemminki, Kari and Försti, Asta and Khyatti, Meriem and Anwar, Wagida A and Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen},
  issn         = {1101-1262},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {64--71},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {European Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Cancer in immigrants as a pointer to the causes of cancer.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/cku102},
  volume       = {24 Suppl 1},
  year         = {2014},
}