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The Components of Well-Being Among Older Persons: A Longitudinal Perspective.

McCamish-Svensson, Cheryl LU (2002)
Abstract (Swedish)
Popular Abstract in Swedish

Två svenska longitudinella kohort studier är basen för denna avhandling som analyserar välbefinnandet hos yngre äldre och äldre äldre. LUND 80+startade 1988, när deltagarna i undersökningen var 80 år gamla (N=212) med årliga uppföljningar tills alla avlidit. DALBY 67+ undersökningen började 1969, när deltagarna var 67 år gamla (N=192) och har följts till 92 års ålder. Båda undersökningarna inkluderar social, psykologisk och fysiologisk undersökning. I denna avhandling har artiklarna I och II baserats på data från Lund 80+ undersökningen, och artiklarna III och IV på data från DALBY 67+ undersökningen.



I artikel I analyseras sambandet mellan det informella stödet från familj och... (More)
Popular Abstract in Swedish

Två svenska longitudinella kohort studier är basen för denna avhandling som analyserar välbefinnandet hos yngre äldre och äldre äldre. LUND 80+startade 1988, när deltagarna i undersökningen var 80 år gamla (N=212) med årliga uppföljningar tills alla avlidit. DALBY 67+ undersökningen började 1969, när deltagarna var 67 år gamla (N=192) och har följts till 92 års ålder. Båda undersökningarna inkluderar social, psykologisk och fysiologisk undersökning. I denna avhandling har artiklarna I och II baserats på data från Lund 80+ undersökningen, och artiklarna III och IV på data från DALBY 67+ undersökningen.



I artikel I analyseras sambandet mellan det informella stödet från familj och vänner, och hälsa i relation till livstillfredsställelse vid 80 och 83 års ålder. Resultaten indikerade att deltagarna, som var kvar i undersökningen hade bättre hälsa och visade större tillfredsällelse med livet jämfört med dem som ej deltog eller dog innan uppföljningen vid 83 års ålder. I motsats till tidigare studier, visade det sig att varken stöd från barn eller vänner hade betydelse för livstillfredställelsen vid 80 eller 83 års ålder (även om kontakten fortfarande var frekvent) medan hälsan var av betydelse för livstillfredsställelse endast vid 83 års ålder. Resultaten pekar på livstillfredställelsens många dimensioner och dess variabilitet bland personer i mycket hög ålder.



Artikel II analyserade psykosociala faktorer och hälsovariabler och deras samband med informella och formella vård- och stödåtgärder från 80 till 82 års ålder. Resultaten visade ett signifikant samband mellan ensamhet och att mottaga formella vårdåtgärder under tre-årsperioden. Det fanns inga signifikanta samband mellan förändringar i hälsan och i det formella stödet. Resultaten visade att ensamhet ofta beledsagade det ökade behovet av stöd med ökande ålder. (Less)
Abstract
Two Swedish longitudinal cohort studies form the basis for this thesis that examines the components of well-being from young old to oldest old. The Lund 80+ cross-sequential design began in 1988 when participants were 80-years old (N=212) and follows them annually until all are deceased. The Dalby 67 began in 1969 when participants were 67 years old (N=192) and continued until they reached 92 years. Both projects include full social, psychological, and physical investigations. For this thesis, Studies I and II are based on data from the Lund 80+ project and Studies III and IV data from the Dalby 67 project. Study I examined the relationship between family and friend social support, health, and life satisfaction at 80 and 83 years. Results... (More)
Two Swedish longitudinal cohort studies form the basis for this thesis that examines the components of well-being from young old to oldest old. The Lund 80+ cross-sequential design began in 1988 when participants were 80-years old (N=212) and follows them annually until all are deceased. The Dalby 67 began in 1969 when participants were 67 years old (N=192) and continued until they reached 92 years. Both projects include full social, psychological, and physical investigations. For this thesis, Studies I and II are based on data from the Lund 80+ project and Studies III and IV data from the Dalby 67 project. Study I examined the relationship between family and friend social support, health, and life satisfaction at 80 and 83 years. Results indicated that participants who remained in the study were not only healthier, but also had higher life satisfaction compared with those who dropped out or died prior to 83 years. In contrast to prior research, neither child nor friend support was related to life satisfaction at 80 or 83 years (even though contact remained frequent) while health was significant only at 83 years. This suggests the mulitdimensionality of life satisfaction and the variability among very old persons. Study II examined the psychosocial and health characteristics and the pattern of informal and formal support from 80 to 82 years. Results showed that only loneliness was significantly associated with receipt of formal support over the three year period. There were no significant changes in health measures and change in support status. These findings show that loneliness often accompanies the need for increased support with age. Study III focused on the correlates of loneliness from young 67 to 92 years. Typical correlates of loneliness such as living alone, gender, and contact with children were not associated with loneliness at any age. “Time passes slowly” and “Poor life adjustment” (evaluated by the interviewer), were significantly associated with loneliness at 67 and 92 years. Even though contact with others remained frequent, the proportion who reported loneliness increased from 67 to 92 years. These results indicate the multidimensionality of loneliness and the need for interventions at all ages to prevent loneliness and activities to offset boredom. Study IV examined the correlates of well-being as measured by an interviewer evaluation of adjustment to aging at 67, 84, and 92 years. Only cognitive and psychological factors were associated with adjustment to aging at all ages. Marital status and contact with children were significant at 67 years only while health measures were not associated with adjustment at any age. External assessments are valid as supplements to self-reports. We conclude that participants who remain in longitudinal studies may represent an elite picture of aging, cultural variations are significant when considering the impact of social support and health on well-being, loneliness and boredom may be accompaniments of advancing years, and correlates of well-being vary with age. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
opponent
  • Professor Tornstam, Lars
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Socialpsykologi, Social psychology, Psykologi, Psychology, Qualitative., Loneliness, Social Support, Life Satisfaction, Well-Being, Longitudinal, Gerontology, Gerontologi
pages
200 pages
publisher
Cheryl McCamish-Svensson, 241 Evening Canyon Road, Corona Del Mar, CA 92625, USA,
defense location
Carolinasalen, Kungshuset
defense date
2002-04-12 10:15
external identifiers
  • other:ISRN-LUSADG/SAPS - - 02/1104 - - SE
ISBN
91-628-5177-2
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7a6292c1-3916-4ad2-8b3d-0bec44fe5dbb (old id 464482)
date added to LUP
2007-09-10 16:01:30
date last changed
2016-09-19 08:45:09
@phdthesis{7a6292c1-3916-4ad2-8b3d-0bec44fe5dbb,
  abstract     = {Two Swedish longitudinal cohort studies form the basis for this thesis that examines the components of well-being from young old to oldest old. The Lund 80+ cross-sequential design began in 1988 when participants were 80-years old (N=212) and follows them annually until all are deceased. The Dalby 67 began in 1969 when participants were 67 years old (N=192) and continued until they reached 92 years. Both projects include full social, psychological, and physical investigations. For this thesis, Studies I and II are based on data from the Lund 80+ project and Studies III and IV data from the Dalby 67 project. Study I examined the relationship between family and friend social support, health, and life satisfaction at 80 and 83 years. Results indicated that participants who remained in the study were not only healthier, but also had higher life satisfaction compared with those who dropped out or died prior to 83 years. In contrast to prior research, neither child nor friend support was related to life satisfaction at 80 or 83 years (even though contact remained frequent) while health was significant only at 83 years. This suggests the mulitdimensionality of life satisfaction and the variability among very old persons. Study II examined the psychosocial and health characteristics and the pattern of informal and formal support from 80 to 82 years. Results showed that only loneliness was significantly associated with receipt of formal support over the three year period. There were no significant changes in health measures and change in support status. These findings show that loneliness often accompanies the need for increased support with age. Study III focused on the correlates of loneliness from young 67 to 92 years. Typical correlates of loneliness such as living alone, gender, and contact with children were not associated with loneliness at any age. “Time passes slowly” and “Poor life adjustment” (evaluated by the interviewer), were significantly associated with loneliness at 67 and 92 years. Even though contact with others remained frequent, the proportion who reported loneliness increased from 67 to 92 years. These results indicate the multidimensionality of loneliness and the need for interventions at all ages to prevent loneliness and activities to offset boredom. Study IV examined the correlates of well-being as measured by an interviewer evaluation of adjustment to aging at 67, 84, and 92 years. Only cognitive and psychological factors were associated with adjustment to aging at all ages. Marital status and contact with children were significant at 67 years only while health measures were not associated with adjustment at any age. External assessments are valid as supplements to self-reports. We conclude that participants who remain in longitudinal studies may represent an elite picture of aging, cultural variations are significant when considering the impact of social support and health on well-being, loneliness and boredom may be accompaniments of advancing years, and correlates of well-being vary with age.},
  author       = {McCamish-Svensson, Cheryl},
  isbn         = {91-628-5177-2},
  keyword      = {Socialpsykologi,Social psychology,Psykologi,Psychology,Qualitative.,Loneliness,Social Support,Life Satisfaction,Well-Being,Longitudinal,Gerontology,Gerontologi},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {200},
  publisher    = {Cheryl McCamish-Svensson, 241 Evening Canyon Road, Corona Del Mar, CA 92625, USA,},
  school       = {Lund University},
  title        = {The Components of Well-Being Among Older Persons: A Longitudinal Perspective.},
  year         = {2002},
}