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Dynamic multimodal drawing in school : Exploring technology support of drawing skills development in children with visual impairments

Szymczak, Delphine LU ; Rassmus-Gröhn, Kirsten LU ; Hedvall, Per Olof LU and Magnusson, Charlotte LU (2019) In Technology and Disability 31(3). p.83-99
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Technology is widely used in school to assist students with visual impairments. Drawing with traditional methods is still difficult for those users. In this paper, we present and discuss an evaluation of a haptic and sound interactive drawing program (HIPP). OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to identify what aspects of the technological aid support the drawing skill development in children with visual impairment. METHODS: Interviews, observations and video recordings of use situations were used for data gathering. Our analysis is based on cultural-historical activity theory, and examines the mediation between the child and the object of their activity, their drawings, as well as the roles of teachers, classmates,... (More)

BACKGROUND: Technology is widely used in school to assist students with visual impairments. Drawing with traditional methods is still difficult for those users. In this paper, we present and discuss an evaluation of a haptic and sound interactive drawing program (HIPP). OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to identify what aspects of the technological aid support the drawing skill development in children with visual impairment. METHODS: Interviews, observations and video recordings of use situations were used for data gathering. Our analysis is based on cultural-historical activity theory, and examines the mediation between the child and the object of their activity, their drawings, as well as the roles of teachers, classmates, assistants, and family. RESULTS: The haptic and audio drawing program supports the steps (doodling, interpretation, planning, and more intentional drawing) observed in visually-acquired drawing, although possible improvements have also been identified. Observations of the drawing program in use showed that its mix of dynamic multimodal interaction and a stable drawing feedback, enable visually impaired students and sighted teachers to jointly access a shared representation. CONCLUSIONS: Successful long-term use, together with the presented results of our analysis show how multimodal dynamic and stable interaction can successfully support drawing activities.

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author
; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cultural Historical Activity Theory, Drawing, haptic, multimodal, qualitative study, visual impairment
in
Technology and Disability
volume
31
issue
3
pages
17 pages
publisher
IOS Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:85073257314
ISSN
1055-4181
DOI
10.3233/TAD-190224
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4651382e-a37a-4524-a468-ed621c4ffe03
date added to LUP
2019-10-25 11:32:57
date last changed
2020-09-18 02:18:07
@article{4651382e-a37a-4524-a468-ed621c4ffe03,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: Technology is widely used in school to assist students with visual impairments. Drawing with traditional methods is still difficult for those users. In this paper, we present and discuss an evaluation of a haptic and sound interactive drawing program (HIPP). OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to identify what aspects of the technological aid support the drawing skill development in children with visual impairment. METHODS: Interviews, observations and video recordings of use situations were used for data gathering. Our analysis is based on cultural-historical activity theory, and examines the mediation between the child and the object of their activity, their drawings, as well as the roles of teachers, classmates, assistants, and family. RESULTS: The haptic and audio drawing program supports the steps (doodling, interpretation, planning, and more intentional drawing) observed in visually-acquired drawing, although possible improvements have also been identified. Observations of the drawing program in use showed that its mix of dynamic multimodal interaction and a stable drawing feedback, enable visually impaired students and sighted teachers to jointly access a shared representation. CONCLUSIONS: Successful long-term use, together with the presented results of our analysis show how multimodal dynamic and stable interaction can successfully support drawing activities.</p>},
  author       = {Szymczak, Delphine and Rassmus-Gröhn, Kirsten and Hedvall, Per Olof and Magnusson, Charlotte},
  issn         = {1055-4181},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {83--99},
  publisher    = {IOS Press},
  series       = {Technology and Disability},
  title        = {Dynamic multimodal drawing in school : Exploring technology support of drawing skills development in children with visual impairments},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/TAD-190224},
  doi          = {10.3233/TAD-190224},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2019},
}