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A 2-year follow-up study of people with severe mental illness involved in psychosocial rehabilitation

Svedberg, Petra; Svensson, Bengt LU ; Hansson, Lars LU and Jormfeldt, Henrika (2014) In Nordic Journal of Psychiatry 68(6). p.401-408
Abstract
Backgrounds. A focus on psychiatric rehabilitation in order to support recovery among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) has been given great attention in research and mental health policy, but less impact on clinical practice. Despite the potential impact of psychiatric rehabilitation on health and wellbeing, there is a lack of research regarding the model called the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach from Boston University (BPR). Aim: The aim was to investigate the outcome of the BPR intervention regarding changes in life situation, use of healthcare services, quality of life, health, psychosocial functioning and empowerment. Methods: The study has a prospective longitudinal design and the setting was seven mental health services... (More)
Backgrounds. A focus on psychiatric rehabilitation in order to support recovery among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) has been given great attention in research and mental health policy, but less impact on clinical practice. Despite the potential impact of psychiatric rehabilitation on health and wellbeing, there is a lack of research regarding the model called the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach from Boston University (BPR). Aim: The aim was to investigate the outcome of the BPR intervention regarding changes in life situation, use of healthcare services, quality of life, health, psychosocial functioning and empowerment. Methods: The study has a prospective longitudinal design and the setting was seven mental health services who worked with the BPR in the county of Halland in Sweden. In total, 71 clients completed the assessment at baseline and of these 49 completed the 2-year follow-up assessments. Results: The most significant finding was an improved psychosocial functioning at the follow-up assessment. Furthermore, 65% of the clients reported that they had mainly or almost completely achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals at the 2-year follow-up. There were significant differences with regard to health, empowerment, quality of life and psychosocial functioning for those who reported that they had mainly/completely had achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals compared to those who reported that they only had to a small extent or not at all reached their goals. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the BPR approach has impact on clients' health, empowerment, quality of life and in particular concerning psychosocial functioning. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach, Choose-Get-Keep Model, Psychiatric rehabilitation, Psychosocial rehabilitation, Severe mental, illness
in
Nordic Journal of Psychiatry
volume
68
issue
6
pages
401 - 408
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • wos:000340099300004
  • scopus:84899888125
ISSN
1502-4725
DOI
10.3109/08039488.2013.851737
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8c567769-b38e-450c-adff-2f38a8d1358a (old id 4659621)
date added to LUP
2014-10-01 07:22:36
date last changed
2017-01-22 03:21:00
@article{8c567769-b38e-450c-adff-2f38a8d1358a,
  abstract     = {Backgrounds. A focus on psychiatric rehabilitation in order to support recovery among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) has been given great attention in research and mental health policy, but less impact on clinical practice. Despite the potential impact of psychiatric rehabilitation on health and wellbeing, there is a lack of research regarding the model called the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach from Boston University (BPR). Aim: The aim was to investigate the outcome of the BPR intervention regarding changes in life situation, use of healthcare services, quality of life, health, psychosocial functioning and empowerment. Methods: The study has a prospective longitudinal design and the setting was seven mental health services who worked with the BPR in the county of Halland in Sweden. In total, 71 clients completed the assessment at baseline and of these 49 completed the 2-year follow-up assessments. Results: The most significant finding was an improved psychosocial functioning at the follow-up assessment. Furthermore, 65% of the clients reported that they had mainly or almost completely achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals at the 2-year follow-up. There were significant differences with regard to health, empowerment, quality of life and psychosocial functioning for those who reported that they had mainly/completely had achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals compared to those who reported that they only had to a small extent or not at all reached their goals. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the BPR approach has impact on clients' health, empowerment, quality of life and in particular concerning psychosocial functioning.},
  author       = {Svedberg, Petra and Svensson, Bengt and Hansson, Lars and Jormfeldt, Henrika},
  issn         = {1502-4725},
  keyword      = {Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach,Choose-Get-Keep Model,Psychiatric rehabilitation,Psychosocial rehabilitation,Severe mental,illness},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {401--408},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {Nordic Journal of Psychiatry},
  title        = {A 2-year follow-up study of people with severe mental illness involved in psychosocial rehabilitation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/08039488.2013.851737},
  volume       = {68},
  year         = {2014},
}