Advanced

Self-injury in youths who lost a parent to cancer: nationwide study of the impact of family-related and health-care-related factors

Grenklo, Tove Bylund; Kreicbergs, Ulrika; Valdimarsdottir, Unnur A.; Nyberg, Tommy; Steineck, Gunnar and Fürst, Carl Johan LU (2014) In Psycho-Oncology 23(9). p.989-997
Abstract
Background: Self-injury, a manifestation of severe psychological distress, is increased in cancer-bereaved youths. Little is known about the potential influence on the risk for self-injury of factors that could be clinically relevant to and modifiable by the health-care professionals involved in the care of the dying parent. Methods: In a nationwide population-based anonymous study, 622 (73.1%) youths (aged 18-26) who, 6 to 9 years earlier at ages 13 to 16, had lost a parent to cancer answered study-specific questions about self-injury and factors related to the family and parental health care. Results: Univariable analyses showed that the risk for self-injury was increased among cancer-bereaved youths who reported poor family cohesion the... (More)
Background: Self-injury, a manifestation of severe psychological distress, is increased in cancer-bereaved youths. Little is known about the potential influence on the risk for self-injury of factors that could be clinically relevant to and modifiable by the health-care professionals involved in the care of the dying parent. Methods: In a nationwide population-based anonymous study, 622 (73.1%) youths (aged 18-26) who, 6 to 9 years earlier at ages 13 to 16, had lost a parent to cancer answered study-specific questions about self-injury and factors related to the family and parental health care. Results: Univariable analyses showed that the risk for self-injury was increased among cancer-bereaved youths who reported poor family cohesion the years before (relative risk [RR], 3.4, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.5-4.6) and after the loss (RR, 3.3, 95% CI, 2.4-4.4), distrust in the health care provided to the dying parent (RR, 1.7, 95% CI, 1.2-2.4), perceiving poor health-care efforts to cure the parent (RR 1.5, 95% CI, 1.1-2.1) and poor efforts to prevent suffering (RR, 1.6, 95% CI, 1.1-2.4), that at least one of their parents had been depressed or had troubles in life (RR, 1.5, CI, 1.1-2.1) and believing 3 days before the loss that the treatment would probably cure the parent (RR, 1.6, CI, 1.1-2.3). In the total multivariable models, only poor family cohesion before and after the loss remained statistically significantly associated with self-injury. Conclusion: Poor family cohesion before and after the loss of a parent to cancer is associated with an increased risk of self-injury in teenage children. Copyright (C) 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Psycho-Oncology
volume
23
issue
9
pages
989 - 997
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000341193100004
  • scopus:84906940743
ISSN
1099-1611
DOI
10.1002/pon.3515
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7090347f-b1a9-497f-ac8e-8e99df8e9830 (old id 4720088)
date added to LUP
2014-11-03 07:17:00
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:21:38
@article{7090347f-b1a9-497f-ac8e-8e99df8e9830,
  abstract     = {Background: Self-injury, a manifestation of severe psychological distress, is increased in cancer-bereaved youths. Little is known about the potential influence on the risk for self-injury of factors that could be clinically relevant to and modifiable by the health-care professionals involved in the care of the dying parent. Methods: In a nationwide population-based anonymous study, 622 (73.1%) youths (aged 18-26) who, 6 to 9 years earlier at ages 13 to 16, had lost a parent to cancer answered study-specific questions about self-injury and factors related to the family and parental health care. Results: Univariable analyses showed that the risk for self-injury was increased among cancer-bereaved youths who reported poor family cohesion the years before (relative risk [RR], 3.4, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.5-4.6) and after the loss (RR, 3.3, 95% CI, 2.4-4.4), distrust in the health care provided to the dying parent (RR, 1.7, 95% CI, 1.2-2.4), perceiving poor health-care efforts to cure the parent (RR 1.5, 95% CI, 1.1-2.1) and poor efforts to prevent suffering (RR, 1.6, 95% CI, 1.1-2.4), that at least one of their parents had been depressed or had troubles in life (RR, 1.5, CI, 1.1-2.1) and believing 3 days before the loss that the treatment would probably cure the parent (RR, 1.6, CI, 1.1-2.3). In the total multivariable models, only poor family cohesion before and after the loss remained statistically significantly associated with self-injury. Conclusion: Poor family cohesion before and after the loss of a parent to cancer is associated with an increased risk of self-injury in teenage children. Copyright (C) 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
  author       = {Grenklo, Tove Bylund and Kreicbergs, Ulrika and Valdimarsdottir, Unnur A. and Nyberg, Tommy and Steineck, Gunnar and Fürst, Carl Johan},
  issn         = {1099-1611},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {989--997},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Psycho-Oncology},
  title        = {Self-injury in youths who lost a parent to cancer: nationwide study of the impact of family-related and health-care-related factors},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pon.3515},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2014},
}