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Retrieving self-vocalized information: An event-related potential (ERP) study on the effect of retrieval orientation

Rosburg, Timm; Johansson, Mikael LU ; Sprondel, Volker and Mecklinger, Axel (2014) In Brain and Cognition 92. p.123-132
Abstract
Retrieval orientation refers to a pre-retrieval process and conceptualizes the specific form of processing that is applied to a retrieval cue. In the current event-related potential (ERP) study, we sought to find evidence for an involvement of the auditory cortex when subjects attempt to retrieve vocalized information, and hypothesized that adopting retrieval orientation would be beneficial for retrieval accuracy. During study, participants saw object words that they subsequently vocalized or visually imagined. At test, participants had to identify object names of one study condition as targets and to reject object names of the second condition together with new items. Target category switched after half of the test trials. Behaviorally,... (More)
Retrieval orientation refers to a pre-retrieval process and conceptualizes the specific form of processing that is applied to a retrieval cue. In the current event-related potential (ERP) study, we sought to find evidence for an involvement of the auditory cortex when subjects attempt to retrieve vocalized information, and hypothesized that adopting retrieval orientation would be beneficial for retrieval accuracy. During study, participants saw object words that they subsequently vocalized or visually imagined. At test, participants had to identify object names of one study condition as targets and to reject object names of the second condition together with new items. Target category switched after half of the test trials. Behaviorally, participants responded less accurately and more slowly to targets of the vocalize condition than to targets of the imagine condition. ERPs to new items varied at a single left electrode (T7) between 500 and 800 ms, indicating a moderate retrieval orientation effect in the subject group as a whole. However, whereas the effect was strongly pronounced in participants with high retrieval accuracy, it was absent in participants with low retrieval accuracy. A current source density (CSD) mapping of the retrieval orientation effect indicated a source over left temporal regions. Independently from retrieval accuracy, the ERP retrieval orientation effect was surprisingly also modulated by test order. Findings are suggestive for an involvement of the auditory cortex in retrieval attempts of vocalized information and confirm that adopting retrieval orientation is potentially beneficial for retrieval accuracy. The effects of test order on retrieval-related processes might reflect a stronger focus on the newness of items in the more difficult test condition when participants started with this condition. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Episodic memory, reality monitoring, event-related potential (ERP), source memory, strategic retrieval
in
Brain and Cognition
volume
92
pages
123 - 132
publisher
Academic Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:25463147
  • wos:000346691700014
  • scopus:84910617757
ISSN
0278-2626
DOI
10.1016/j.bandc.2014.10.011
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e0cde659-b9b3-478a-a918-184066e11a93 (old id 4730688)
date added to LUP
2014-10-28 11:33:14
date last changed
2017-09-17 03:39:36
@article{e0cde659-b9b3-478a-a918-184066e11a93,
  abstract     = {Retrieval orientation refers to a pre-retrieval process and conceptualizes the specific form of processing that is applied to a retrieval cue. In the current event-related potential (ERP) study, we sought to find evidence for an involvement of the auditory cortex when subjects attempt to retrieve vocalized information, and hypothesized that adopting retrieval orientation would be beneficial for retrieval accuracy. During study, participants saw object words that they subsequently vocalized or visually imagined. At test, participants had to identify object names of one study condition as targets and to reject object names of the second condition together with new items. Target category switched after half of the test trials. Behaviorally, participants responded less accurately and more slowly to targets of the vocalize condition than to targets of the imagine condition. ERPs to new items varied at a single left electrode (T7) between 500 and 800 ms, indicating a moderate retrieval orientation effect in the subject group as a whole. However, whereas the effect was strongly pronounced in participants with high retrieval accuracy, it was absent in participants with low retrieval accuracy. A current source density (CSD) mapping of the retrieval orientation effect indicated a source over left temporal regions. Independently from retrieval accuracy, the ERP retrieval orientation effect was surprisingly also modulated by test order. Findings are suggestive for an involvement of the auditory cortex in retrieval attempts of vocalized information and confirm that adopting retrieval orientation is potentially beneficial for retrieval accuracy. The effects of test order on retrieval-related processes might reflect a stronger focus on the newness of items in the more difficult test condition when participants started with this condition.},
  author       = {Rosburg, Timm and Johansson, Mikael and Sprondel, Volker and Mecklinger, Axel},
  issn         = {0278-2626},
  keyword      = {Episodic memory,reality monitoring,event-related potential (ERP),source memory,strategic retrieval},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {123--132},
  publisher    = {Academic Press},
  series       = {Brain and Cognition},
  title        = {Retrieving self-vocalized information: An event-related potential (ERP) study on the effect of retrieval orientation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandc.2014.10.011},
  volume       = {92},
  year         = {2014},
}