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Accelerometer measured physical activity, methodological and health related aspects

Tanha, Tina LU (2014) In Lund University, Faculty of Medicine Doctoral Dissertation Series 2014:124.
Abstract
Introduction

Ihe association of physical inactivity with mortality, cardiovascular disease and cancer is extensively studied in adults. Clustering of cardiovascular risk factors and objectively measured physical activity in children and youth has not been convincingly established. The sustainability of objectively measured physical activity into adulihood is not satisfactorily studied. Accelerometers are suitable for assessment of physical activity. However, due to constantly newer accelerometer-models on the market, studies should be performed to guarantee their interchangeability.

Aims

I. ls accelerometer measured physical activity correlated to a composite cardiovascular risk factor score in ... (More)
Introduction

Ihe association of physical inactivity with mortality, cardiovascular disease and cancer is extensively studied in adults. Clustering of cardiovascular risk factors and objectively measured physical activity in children and youth has not been convincingly established. The sustainability of objectively measured physical activity into adulihood is not satisfactorily studied. Accelerometers are suitable for assessment of physical activity. However, due to constantly newer accelerometer-models on the market, studies should be performed to guarantee their interchangeability.

Aims

I. ls accelerometer measured physical activity correlated to a composite cardiovascular risk factor score in children?

II. Are physical activity, aerobic fitness and body fat associated with autonomic function in children?

III. Does physical activity track in children over a 2 year time period?

IV. Is the new generation Actigraph accelerometer (GTIM) comparable to the old generation Actigraph accelerometer (7164) in laboratory settings?

V. Does time spent in physical activity differ between Actigraph GTlM and 7164 in freeliving settings?

Methods

Parameters measured: aerobic fitness (VO2PEAK), body fat (by dual X-ray absolptiometry), heart rate, blood pressure, physical activity (accelerometers), head-up tilt test and deep breath test.

Results and Conclusions

I. Physical activity was correlated to a composite cardiovascular risk factor score.

II. Low-moderate tracking of all physical activity levels was observed in 9-12 year otd children.

III. Physical activity and body fat were not significantly associated with autonomic function. Aerobic fitness was correlated to autonomic function in boys.

IV. Accelerometer GTIM showed lower counts compared to 7164 in laboratory settings.

V. Time spent in physical activity was lower from accelerometer GTIM compared to 7164 in free-living settings. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
supervisor
opponent
  • Professor Anderssen, Sigmund, The Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
in
Lund University, Faculty of Medicine Doctoral Dissertation Series
volume
2014:124
pages
61 pages
publisher
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University
defense location
Inga Marie Nilssonsgata 49, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö
defense date
2014-10-14 13:00
ISSN
1652-8220
ISBN
978-91-7619-053-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
df738d47-25f0-430f-991f-eb2ac1a4e097 (old id 4739852)
date added to LUP
2014-11-05 11:20:50
date last changed
2016-09-19 08:44:46
@phdthesis{df738d47-25f0-430f-991f-eb2ac1a4e097,
  abstract     = {Introduction<br/><br>
Ihe association of physical inactivity with mortality, cardiovascular disease and cancer is extensively studied in adults. Clustering of cardiovascular risk factors and objectively measured physical activity in children and youth has not been convincingly established. The sustainability of objectively measured physical activity into adulihood is not satisfactorily studied. Accelerometers are suitable for assessment of physical activity. However, due to constantly newer accelerometer-models on the market, studies should be performed to guarantee their interchangeability.<br/><br>
Aims<br/><br>
I. ls accelerometer measured physical activity correlated to a composite cardiovascular risk factor score in children?<br/><br>
II. Are physical activity, aerobic fitness and body fat associated with autonomic function in children?<br/><br>
III. Does physical activity track in children over a 2 year time period?<br/><br>
IV. Is the new generation Actigraph accelerometer (GTIM) comparable to the old generation Actigraph accelerometer (7164) in laboratory settings?<br/><br>
V. Does time spent in physical activity differ between Actigraph GTlM and 7164 in freeliving settings?<br/><br>
Methods<br/><br>
Parameters measured: aerobic fitness (VO2PEAK), body fat (by dual X-ray absolptiometry), heart rate, blood pressure, physical activity (accelerometers), head-up tilt test and deep breath test.<br/><br>
Results and Conclusions<br/><br>
I. Physical activity was correlated to a composite cardiovascular risk factor score.<br/><br>
II. Low-moderate tracking of all physical activity levels was observed in 9-12 year otd children.<br/><br>
III. Physical activity and body fat were not significantly associated with autonomic function. Aerobic fitness was correlated to autonomic function in boys.<br/><br>
IV. Accelerometer GTIM showed lower counts compared to 7164 in laboratory settings.<br/><br>
V. Time spent in physical activity was lower from accelerometer GTIM compared to 7164 in free-living settings.},
  author       = {Tanha, Tina},
  isbn         = {978-91-7619-053-1},
  issn         = {1652-8220},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {61},
  publisher    = {Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University},
  school       = {Lund University},
  series       = {Lund University, Faculty of Medicine Doctoral Dissertation Series},
  title        = {Accelerometer measured physical activity, methodological and health related aspects},
  volume       = {2014:124},
  year         = {2014},
}