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The status of essential elements and associations with milk yield and the occurrence of mastitis in organic and conventional dairy herds

Blanco-Penedo, I.; Lundh, Thomas LU ; Holtenius, K.; Fall, N. and Emanuelson, U. (2014) In Livestock Science 168. p.120-127
Abstract
There is a lack of detailed information on the impact of organic feeding regulation on the health and well-being of cows. This has become especially important since January 2008 when the EU required 100% organic ration for organic dairy herds. The aim of this investigation was to determine and compare the levels of essential elements in organic and conventional dairy herds, and to associate them with milk yield and the occurrence of mastitis. The field study was carried out in 10 organic and 10 conventional herds from 2005 to 2010. This period included the point in time when the ration became 100% organic in organic dairy herds. Essential element concentrations (Cu, Co, Se, Zn, Mn, Mo, I and Fe) were determined by inductively coupled... (More)
There is a lack of detailed information on the impact of organic feeding regulation on the health and well-being of cows. This has become especially important since January 2008 when the EU required 100% organic ration for organic dairy herds. The aim of this investigation was to determine and compare the levels of essential elements in organic and conventional dairy herds, and to associate them with milk yield and the occurrence of mastitis. The field study was carried out in 10 organic and 10 conventional herds from 2005 to 2010. This period included the point in time when the ration became 100% organic in organic dairy herds. Essential element concentrations (Cu, Co, Se, Zn, Mn, Mo, I and Fe) were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in 158 serum samples. Associations between concentrations of elements and milk yield and mastitis were determined with mixed linear and logistic regression models, respectively. No significant differences in metal levels between organic and conventional herds were found. No severely deficient concentrations of essential elements were observed in organic herds, either before or after the change in regulation. Cows with low serum concentrations of Se had lower somatic cell counts. Daily milk yield was significantly influenced by deficient concentrations of Cu. For the evaluation of clinical mastitis occurrence, herds were classified for each element, based on the individual values of the sampled cows. Low levels of some elements (Se, I) were associated with a reduced risk of mastitis occurrence. However, other elements indicated a protective effect against mastitis. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Essential metals, Regulation 889/2008, Lactation, Mastitis, Organic cows
in
Livestock Science
volume
168
pages
120 - 127
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000343363200016
  • scopus:84907978698
ISSN
1871-1413
DOI
10.1016/j.livsci.2014.07.016
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
23f4862d-6d2d-40ed-af10-0119de96557c (old id 4787460)
date added to LUP
2014-12-01 07:36:01
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:57:08
@article{23f4862d-6d2d-40ed-af10-0119de96557c,
  abstract     = {There is a lack of detailed information on the impact of organic feeding regulation on the health and well-being of cows. This has become especially important since January 2008 when the EU required 100% organic ration for organic dairy herds. The aim of this investigation was to determine and compare the levels of essential elements in organic and conventional dairy herds, and to associate them with milk yield and the occurrence of mastitis. The field study was carried out in 10 organic and 10 conventional herds from 2005 to 2010. This period included the point in time when the ration became 100% organic in organic dairy herds. Essential element concentrations (Cu, Co, Se, Zn, Mn, Mo, I and Fe) were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in 158 serum samples. Associations between concentrations of elements and milk yield and mastitis were determined with mixed linear and logistic regression models, respectively. No significant differences in metal levels between organic and conventional herds were found. No severely deficient concentrations of essential elements were observed in organic herds, either before or after the change in regulation. Cows with low serum concentrations of Se had lower somatic cell counts. Daily milk yield was significantly influenced by deficient concentrations of Cu. For the evaluation of clinical mastitis occurrence, herds were classified for each element, based on the individual values of the sampled cows. Low levels of some elements (Se, I) were associated with a reduced risk of mastitis occurrence. However, other elements indicated a protective effect against mastitis. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Blanco-Penedo, I. and Lundh, Thomas and Holtenius, K. and Fall, N. and Emanuelson, U.},
  issn         = {1871-1413},
  keyword      = {Essential metals,Regulation 889/2008,Lactation,Mastitis,Organic cows},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {120--127},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Livestock Science},
  title        = {The status of essential elements and associations with milk yield and the occurrence of mastitis in organic and conventional dairy herds},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.livsci.2014.07.016},
  volume       = {168},
  year         = {2014},
}