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Contribution of shared environmental factors to familial aggregation of common cancers: an adoption study in Sweden.

Sundquist, Kristina LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Ji, Jianguang LU (2015) In European Journal of Cancer Prevention 24(2). p.162-164
Abstract
Cancer runs in families, suggesting a heritable component, but the contribution of environmental factors cannot be neglected. Studies on spousal risk can partly disentangle the environmental contribution but miss shared environmental factors during childhood and adolescence. Here, we examined the familial aggregation of common cancers among 80 281 Swedish-born adoptees, identified from the national Swedish Multigeneration Register, and linked them to the Swedish Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for common cancers (colorectal, lung, breast, prostate, and skin cancers) in the adoptees whose adoptive parents were diagnosed with concordant cancers, compared with the general population. SIRs in adoptees with... (More)
Cancer runs in families, suggesting a heritable component, but the contribution of environmental factors cannot be neglected. Studies on spousal risk can partly disentangle the environmental contribution but miss shared environmental factors during childhood and adolescence. Here, we examined the familial aggregation of common cancers among 80 281 Swedish-born adoptees, identified from the national Swedish Multigeneration Register, and linked them to the Swedish Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for common cancers (colorectal, lung, breast, prostate, and skin cancers) in the adoptees whose adoptive parents were diagnosed with concordant cancers, compared with the general population. SIRs in adoptees with an affected adoptive parent ranged from 1.00 (breast cancer) to 1.28 (skin cancer), whereas the SIRs in nonadoptees with an affected parent ranged from 1.63 (colorectal cancer) to 2.12 (skin cancer). Environmental factors account for around 0-28% of the familial aggregation. Cancer sites with high environmental contributions were observed for skin and colorectal cancers, which are known to have strong environmental causes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Cancer Prevention
volume
24
issue
2
pages
162 - 164
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:25415834
  • wos:000349003700014
  • scopus:84927689497
ISSN
1473-5709
DOI
10.1097/CEJ.0000000000000101
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
260d51fb-274f-4b47-8903-574947120e5d (old id 4816339)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25415834?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-12-03 14:54:56
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:42:59
@article{260d51fb-274f-4b47-8903-574947120e5d,
  abstract     = {Cancer runs in families, suggesting a heritable component, but the contribution of environmental factors cannot be neglected. Studies on spousal risk can partly disentangle the environmental contribution but miss shared environmental factors during childhood and adolescence. Here, we examined the familial aggregation of common cancers among 80 281 Swedish-born adoptees, identified from the national Swedish Multigeneration Register, and linked them to the Swedish Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for common cancers (colorectal, lung, breast, prostate, and skin cancers) in the adoptees whose adoptive parents were diagnosed with concordant cancers, compared with the general population. SIRs in adoptees with an affected adoptive parent ranged from 1.00 (breast cancer) to 1.28 (skin cancer), whereas the SIRs in nonadoptees with an affected parent ranged from 1.63 (colorectal cancer) to 2.12 (skin cancer). Environmental factors account for around 0-28% of the familial aggregation. Cancer sites with high environmental contributions were observed for skin and colorectal cancers, which are known to have strong environmental causes.},
  author       = {Sundquist, Kristina and Sundquist, Jan and Ji, Jianguang},
  issn         = {1473-5709},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {162--164},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {European Journal of Cancer Prevention},
  title        = {Contribution of shared environmental factors to familial aggregation of common cancers: an adoption study in Sweden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CEJ.0000000000000101},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2015},
}