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Sound symbolism : The role of word sound in meaning

Svantesson, Jan Olof LU (2017) In Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science 8(5). p.1441-1441
Abstract

The question whether there is a natural connection between sound and meaning or if they are related only by convention has been debated since antiquity. In linguistics, it is usually taken for granted that 'the linguistic sign is arbitrary,' and exceptions like onomatopoeia have been regarded as marginal phenomena. However, it is becoming more and more clear that motivated relations between sound and meaning are more common and important than has been thought. There is now a large and rapidly growing literature on subjects as ideophones (or expressives), words that describe how a speaker perceives a situation with the senses, and phonaesthemes, units like English gl-, which occur in many words that share a meaning component (in this... (More)

The question whether there is a natural connection between sound and meaning or if they are related only by convention has been debated since antiquity. In linguistics, it is usually taken for granted that 'the linguistic sign is arbitrary,' and exceptions like onomatopoeia have been regarded as marginal phenomena. However, it is becoming more and more clear that motivated relations between sound and meaning are more common and important than has been thought. There is now a large and rapidly growing literature on subjects as ideophones (or expressives), words that describe how a speaker perceives a situation with the senses, and phonaesthemes, units like English gl-, which occur in many words that share a meaning component (in this case 'light': gleam, glitter, etc.). Furthermore, psychological experiments have shown that sound symbolism in one language can be understood by speakers of other languages, suggesting that some kinds of sound symbolism are universal. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science
volume
8
issue
5
pages
1441 - 1441
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:85017194204
  • wos:000407913400002
ISSN
1939-5078
DOI
10.1002/wcs.1441
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
48534a31-c5c2-4e06-a9c7-677bcd76349a
date added to LUP
2017-05-04 09:31:38
date last changed
2018-02-18 22:26:54
@article{48534a31-c5c2-4e06-a9c7-677bcd76349a,
  abstract     = {<p>The question whether there is a natural connection between sound and meaning or if they are related only by convention has been debated since antiquity. In linguistics, it is usually taken for granted that 'the linguistic sign is arbitrary,' and exceptions like onomatopoeia have been regarded as marginal phenomena. However, it is becoming more and more clear that motivated relations between sound and meaning are more common and important than has been thought. There is now a large and rapidly growing literature on subjects as ideophones (or expressives), words that describe how a speaker perceives a situation with the senses, and phonaesthemes, units like English gl-, which occur in many words that share a meaning component (in this case 'light': gleam, glitter, etc.). Furthermore, psychological experiments have shown that sound symbolism in one language can be understood by speakers of other languages, suggesting that some kinds of sound symbolism are universal. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.</p>},
  author       = {Svantesson, Jan Olof},
  issn         = {1939-5078},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1441--1441},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science},
  title        = {Sound symbolism : The role of word sound in meaning},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1441},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2017},
}